Tag Archives: summit

2010 Fortune Most Powerful Women Summit

Posted by: Audiegrl
Written by Tina Tchen

Members of the audience stand and applaud as President Barack Obama arrives to address the 2010 Fortune Most Powerful Women Summit at the Mellon Auditorium in Washington, D.C., Oct. 5, 2010. (Official White House Photo by Samantha Appleton)

Yesterday, I participated in events for the Fortune Most Powerful Women’s Summit – held for the first time ever in Washington, D.C.! The Summit includes over 500 women leaders from business, government, philanthropy, media, education, and the arts. I started the evening at a Minute Mentoring session with 75 impressive high school girls from across the Washington, DC area. This lively group of girls was selected because they submitted applications where they were asked to write about their career aspirations. During the mentoring session, I got to spend one-on-one time with the girls, answering their questions, offering support and providing advice. They were remarkable young women!

After the mentoring session, the girls and I were off to the Fortune dinner. This event was attended by incredible women – including a number of senior level women from our Administration. President Obama keynoted the event and talked about the efforts we are undertaking to rebuild our economy, and the importance of women in business and the workforce. The President highlighted the 75 young women leaders and listed some of their career aspirations – “cultural anthropologist”, “classical singer”, “U.S. Senator” and a “professional race car driver”. He spoke eloquently about the steps that the Administration has taken to support their dreams and make women and girls a priority. The President addressed more broadly our efforts on behalf of small businesses, our efforts to train and educate workers, make our workplace more flexible, and make America more competitive. It was a special evening and an important statement about the Administration’s commitment to women and girls.

Tina Tchen is Director of the White House Office of Public Engagement and Executive Director of the Council on Women and Girls

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Filed under Change, First Lady Michelle Obama, Pres. Barack Obama, Uncategorized, Women's Issues

Brad Pitt Honored for Humanitarian Work in New Orleans

Posted by TheLCster

Actor Brad Pitt speaks during a panel discussion about rebuilding New Orleans, at the Clinton Global Initiative, in New York, September 24, 2009. About 1,200 participants including heads of state, business leaders, humanitarians and celebrities will attend the fifth annual Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) which started on Tuesday.

Actor Brad Pitt speaks during a panel discussion about rebuilding New Orleans, at the Clinton Global Initiative, in New York, September 24, 2009. About 1,200 participants including heads of state, business leaders, humanitarians and celebrities will attend the fifth annual Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) which started on Tuesday.


Reuters Television—Actor Brad Pitt was honored on Thursday for his humanitarian work in helping rebuild hurricane-ravaged New Orleans at former U.S. President Bill Clinton’s philanthropic summit, the Clinton Global Initiative.

Pitt was presented with a plaque from the U.S. Green Building Council which said the actor and his foundation “Make It Right” had created the “largest and greenest single-family community in the world.”

“‘Make It Right’ has exceeded my expectations,” said Pitt who set up the foundation in 2007.

“Our criteria from the beginning were at odds, to say the least. We demanded that these homes be sustainable, that they have aesthetic qualities … that they be storm resilient and take safety in mind of the families who live there and that they would be affordable.”

“Make It Right” has created 13 homes in the New Orleans area the 9th Ward, which was devastated by Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

Each house is unique and has eco-friendly features like green roofs, which can cut heating and cooling costs dramatically.

Pitt said the biggest challenge was keeping homes affordable.

Continued@Reuters_media_us

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Filed under Culture, Green, Hollywood, Media and Entertainment, Money, News, Philanthropy, Uncategorized

President Obama’s Saturday Youtube Address 09/19/09

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WhiteHouse.gov—With the next G20 Summit approaching in Pittsburgh, the President goes over the progress in stemming a global economic crisis. He discusses the impact of the Recovery Act, and pledges that “lobbyists for big Wall Street banks” will not prevent real reform for the future, including a new Consumer Financial Protection Agency.

Remarks of President Barack Obama
Weekly Address
The White House
September 19, 2009

Leaders of the world’s largest economies will gather next week in Pittsburgh for the second time this year. The first meeting of the G-20 nations in April came at the height of the global financial crisis – a crisis that required unprecedented international cooperation to jumpstart the world’s economies and help break the downward spiral that enveloped all our nations.

At next week’s summit, we’ll have, in effect, a five-month checkup to review the steps each nation has taken – separately and together – to break the back of this economic crisis. And the good news is that we’ve made real progress since last time we met – here at home and around the world.

In February, we enacted a Recovery Act, providing relief to Americans who need it, preventing layoffs, and putting Americans back to work. We’ve worked to unlock frozen credit markets, spurring lending to Americans looking to buy homes or cars, take out student loans, or finance small businesses. And we’ve challenged other nations to join us not only to spur global demand, but to address the underlying problems that caused such a deep global recession in the first place.

Because of the steps taken by our nation and all nations, we can now say that we have stopped our economic freefall. But we also know that stopping the bleeding isn’t nearly enough. Our work is far from over. We know we still have a lot to do here at home to build an economy that is producing good jobs for all those who are looking for work today. And we know we still have a lot to do, in conjunction with nations around the world, to strengthen the rules governing financial markets and ensure that we never again find ourselves in the precarious situation we found ourselves in just one year ago.

As I told leaders of our financial community in New York City earlier this week, a return to normalcy can’t breed complacency. To protect our economy and people from another market meltdown, our government needs to fundamentally reform the rules governing financial firms and markets to meet the challenges of the 21st century. We cannot allow the thirst for reckless schemes that produce quick profits and fat executive bonuses to override the security of our entire financial system and leave taxpayers on the hook for cleaning up the mess. And as the world’s largest economy, we must lead, not just by word, but by example, understanding that in the 21st century, financial crises know no borders. All of us need to act more responsibly on behalf of a better economic future.

That is why, at next week’s G20 summit, we’ll discuss some of the steps that are required to safeguard our global financial system and close gaps in regulation around the world – gaps that permitted the kinds of reckless risk-taking and irresponsibility that led to the crisis. And that’s why I’ve called on Congress to put in place a series of tough, common-sense rules of the road that will protect consumers from abuse, let markets function fairly and freely, and help prevent a crisis like this from ever happening again.

Central to these reforms is a new Consumer Financial Protection Agency. Part of what led to this crisis were not just decisions made on Wall Street, but also unsustainable mortgage loans made across the country. While many folks took on more than they knew they could afford, too often folks signed contracts they didn’t fully understand offered by lenders who didn’t always tell the truth. That’s why we need clear rules, clearly enforced. And that’s what this agency will do.

Consumers shouldn’t have to worry about loan contracts written to confuse, hidden fees attached to their mortgages, and financial penalties – whether through a credit card or debit card – that appear without a clear warning on their statements. And responsible lenders, including community banks, trying to do the right thing shouldn’t have to worry about ruinous competition from unregulated and unscrupulous competitors.

Not surprisingly, lobbyists for big Wall Street banks are hard at work trying to stop reforms that would hold them accountable and they want to keep things just the way they are. But we cannot let politics as usual triumph so business as usual can reign. We cannot let the narrow interests of a few come before the interests of all of us. We cannot forget how close we came to the brink, and perpetuate the broken system and breakdown of responsibility that made it possible.

In the weeks and months ahead, we have an opportunity to build on the work we’ve already done. An opportunity to rebuild our global economy stronger that before. An opportunity not only to protect the American people and America’s economy, but to promote sustained and balanced growth and prosperity for our nation and all nations. And that’s an opportunity I am determined to seize.

So, thanks for listening and thanks for watching, and to our Jewish friends, who are celebrating Rosh Hashanah, have a happy and healthy New Year. Shanah Tovah.

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Filed under Democrats, Economy, G20, Politics, Pres. Barack Obama, Weekly YouTube Address

MSNBC Reporter Heckled At Values Voter Summit

Posted by Audiegrl

I watched this happen live today, and yes, my mouth was hanging open in shock. While reporting this afternoon from the floor of the Values Voter Summit, MSNBC reporter Brian Mooar was heckled by several audience members who said he was being rude and disrespectful.

Why are conservatives so damn angry? We have seen this type of behavior before. At teabag rallies, health care townhalls, and of course recently during the President’s speech about health care in the House of Representatives.

Why are they so put-upon and angry with everyone that doesn’t have the same ideology? Does this entitle them to throw out all forms of civility? Believe me, no one was more upset with Bush and his cronies for the last eight years, than I was. Well maybe Code Pink was more angry. 😉

But it would have never crossed my mind to be openly rude to a Republican. I always felt that we could always channel our anger in a constructive way, like social networking, civil protests, rallies, or ultimately in the voting booth.

This episode today was so far out of left field, that MSNBC now reports that Mooar received a personal apology from Tony Perkins, President of the Family Research Council, the organization behind the summit. Perkins also said there would be an announcement made telling the audience to be respectful of the press.

I am pretty sure that this was not the picture that Republican’s wanted to show to the world today. Its a very ugly picture.

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Here is another video, but this time they are heckling the Fox reporter. Now when they are even asking the Fox reporter to leave, then you know something is wrong in the universe.

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Filed under Media and Entertainment, Partisan Politics, Politics, Republicans, Uncategorized