Tag Archives: star

Star in Your Own Oscars® Viewing Party!


Event Producer Cheryl Cecchetto shows you the “10 Must Haves” to throwing an awarding-winning party; Master Chef Wolfgang Puck cooks and provides you with delicious and easy-to-make-at-home recipes; Executive Pastry Chef Sherry Yard shows you how to bake a yummy dessert; and Moët & Chandon, the exclusive champagne of the Oscars, provides a special cocktail that will wow your guests.

Invite your family and friends; download Oscar® ballots, party play-along games, recipes, cocktails ideas and much more.

Oscar® Night Essentials
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44-D’s Oscar® Ballot
Predict the winners using this downloadable/printable Oscar® ballot.
Download

Oscar® Bingo
Download Bingo cards and play along as you watch the show! (Nine different cards available)
Download

Oscar® Crossword Puzzle
Test your Oscar smarts with this Academy Awards-themed crossword puzzle.
Download

Party Planning Ideas
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Cheryl Cecchetto (founder and president of Sequoia Productions) shares with you the 10 must haves to hosting the Best Oscar-viewing party in town! She’ll take you step-by-step from invites to games, from décor to food. Everything you need to throw an award-winning party for your friends and family.
Watch Video

Cocktail Recipes

The Moët Golden Glamour

0.25 oz vanilla liqueur
1.5 oz passion fruit juice
4 oz Moet & Chandon Imperial champagne
Mint sprig, for garnish
Watch Demonstration

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The Red Carpet Fizz

1/2 oz Pomegranate Juice
1/3 oz Orange Liquor
Add Fresh Raspberries
Top with Moët & Chandon White Star Champagne

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The Ultimate Accolade

1/2 oz Orange Vodka
1/3 oz Orange Juice
Top with Moët & Chandon White Star Champagne

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The Golden Rush

1/3 oz Orange Vodka
1/3 oz Sugar Syrup
2 Dashes Fresh Lemon Juice
Top with Moët & Chandon White Star Champagne

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Non-Alcoholic Beverages

Serve sparkling apple, pomegranate, or blueberry juice – for a bubbly toast at any party!

Mix cranberry juice with lime soda and add a twist of lime for an elegant beverage.
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Appetizer Recipes

Smoked Salmon Blinis

Oscar’s Master Chef Wolfgang Puck shows how to make blinis with smoked salmon and dill cream. The little flour pancakes known as blini are a traditional platform for serving smoked salmon.
Recipe
Watch Demonstration

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Prime Mini Burgers with Cheddar Cheese and Remoulade

Toasted Brioche circles for buns, and topped with Remoulade, these sliders are elegant enough to serve at a wedding. Allow three burgers per person and top with tomato, arugula, and cornichon slices.
Recipe

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Vegetable Spring Rolls with Chinese Mustard

Forget about the greasy, tasteless spring rolls you once tasted from the take out restaurant. These are wonderful, crisp, fresh-tasting morsels that look a lot more complicated to make than they really are.
Recipe

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Entrée Recipes

Slow Braised Short Ribs

These are meltingly tender and flavorful short ribs. To make them even neater to present and easier to eat, ask the butcher to bone the short ribs for you. Feel free to dredge them with all-purpose flour instead of the matzoh meal.
Recipe
Watch Demonstration

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Pizza with Smoked Salmon & Caviar

You can top the pizza with Sevruga, Beluga, or Osetra caviar; less expensive salmon roe or just chopped fresh chives. To make the pizza ahead, bake it for just 5 minutes; then, just before serving, complete the baking and top the pizza.
Recipe

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Dessert Recipe

Molten Lava Chocolate Cake

Sherry Yard demonstrates how to create molten chocolate lava cakes. Close your eyes when you take the first bite of this cake. Roll it across your tongue and let the flavor linger. If you’re a chocolate lover you’ll be transported.
Recipe
Watch Demonstration

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Filed under 82nd Academy Awards, Culture, Drinks, entertaining, Food, Hollywood, Party Planning, Uncategorized

Lopez Tonight! Guest Schedule for 03/1 thru 03/4

Posted by: Audiegrl


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Monday, March 1, 2010

Julia MancusoJulia Mancuso
Dax Shepard
Nicole Eggert
New Boyz
‘Jersey Shore Presents: The Hurt Locker and Inglorious Basterds’

Tuesday, March 2, 2010

Tracey UllmanTracey Ullman
Bret Michaels
‘Jersey Shore Presents: Inglorious Basterds and Avatar’
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Wednesday, March 3, 2010

T-PainT-Pain
Mario Lopez
Anjelah Johnson
‘Jersey Shore Presents: The Blind Side’

Thursday, March 4, 2010

Seann William ScottSeann William Scott
Shaun White
Andrew Dice Clay
‘Jersey Shore Presents: Up in the Air’

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Great Live Music Clip from Last Week’s Show

Matt Morris is an American singer-songwriter. The son of country music star Gary Morris, Morris made his show business debut on stage with his father. Morris is openly gay and married his husband Sean Michael Morris when same sex couples were allowed to do so in California. His husband was his inspiration for the song “Love” found on his debut album.

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Filed under 82nd Academy Awards, Dancing, Entertainment, Lopez Tonight, Music, Pop Culture, Video/YouTube

Academy Award® Nominated: Bright Star

Ensemble post by: Audiegrl, Geot, and BuellBoy


London 1818: a secret love affair begins between 23 year-old English poet, John Keats (Ben Whishaw), and the girl next door, Fanny Brawne (Abbie Cornish), an out-spoken student of high fashion. This unlikely pair begin at odds, he thinking her a stylish minx, while she was unimpressed not only by his poetry but also by literature in general.

However, when Fanny heard that Keats was nursing his seriously ill younger brother, her efforts to help touched Keats and when she asked him to teach her about poetry he agreed. The poetry soon became a romantic remedy that worked not only to sort their differences, but also to fuel an impassioned love affair.

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The cast includes: Ben Whishaw, Abbie Cornish, Kerry Fox, Paul Schneider, Edie Martin, Thomas Sangster, Gerard Monaco, Antonia Campbell-Huges, Samuel Roukin, and Amanda Hale

Reviews

IMDB member from England
“I saw this film tonight, and in my eyes, it is a perfect film. Beautifully acted by all involved, (several times during the film I found myself thinking ‘Abby Cornish is amazing!”, despite not being a huge fan before), and stunningly shot, it contains some of the most beautifully cinematic scenes i have ever seen committed to film. Campion does a wonderful job of communicating Fanny’ emotional state through the composition, particularly in one scene where the wind is blowing the curtain in her bedroom. The light and colour are fresh and gorgeous and the costumes and design add to the overall piece without being distracting, which is just what you want from a period piece.

But in the end, it is above all a wonderful story, well told. A deeply romantic tale, the story of Fanny and Keats could easily have become a mawkish, overly sentimental piece. But through her wonderfully naturalistic dialogue, her use of humour and light touch, and her restrained story telling (she never lets a scene go on one line too long) Jane Campion has created a heart wrenching film which I cannot fault. The characters are real and fully rounded, you feel the joys and the pain with them, and where I think she really succeeds is by making their love affair extraordinary and yet at the same time deeply ordinary. It stirred up my own personal experiences of love and loss and you would have to have a heart of stone not to shed a tear at the end. Lovely lovely film, and what cinema should be all about.”

Did You Know?

The Hyde House and Estate in Hyde, Bedfordshire substituted for the Keats House in Hampstead. Jane Campion decided that the Keats House (also known as Wentworth Place) was too small and “a little bit fusty“.

The film shot for one day in Rome. Keats’ funeral procession was the last scene to be filmed and the only scene of the film not shot in the UK.

One Nomination

Best in Costume Design

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Filed under 82nd Academy Awards, Best Costume Design, Books, Culture, England, Entertainment, Hollywood, Pop Culture, Uncategorized, Video/YouTube, Women's Issues, World

Academy Award® Nominated: Star Trek

Ensemble post by: Audiegrl, Geot, BuellBoy, Ogenec and TheLCster


On the day of James Kirk’s birth, his father dies on his ship in a last stand against a mysterious alien vessel. He was looking for Ambassador Spock, who is a child on Vulcan at that time, disdained by his neighbors for his half-human nature. Twenty years later, Kirk has grown into a young troublemaker inspired by Capt. Christopher Pike to fulfill his potential in Starfleet even as he annoys his instructors like young Lt. Spock. Suddenly, there is an emergency at Vulcan and the newly commissioned USS Enterprise is crewed with promising cadets like Nyota Uhura, Hikaru Sulu, Pavel Chekov and even Kirk himself thanks to Leonard McCoy’s medical trickery. Together, this crew will have an adventure in the final frontier where the old legend is altered forever even as the new version of it is just beginning.

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Credits

Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J.J. Abrams
Producer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J.J. Abrams
Producer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Damon Lindelof
Co-Producer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David Witz
Associate Producer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David Baronoff
Executive Producers . Jeffrey Chernov, Alex Kurtzman, Bryan Burk, and Roberto Orci

The cast includes: Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Leonard Nimoy, Eric Bana, Bruce Greenwood, Karl Urban, Zoe Saldana, Simon Pegg, John Cho, Anton Yelchin, Ben cross, Winona Ryder, Chris Hemsworkth, Jennifer Morrison, and Rachel Nichols

44D’s Reviews

TheLCster
As an aspiring nerd (no not geek, nerd, yes…there is a difference) I have been trying to break into the world of Star Trek in the traditional sense…watching it episode by episode, series by series. I take sci-fi very seriously! lol This new movie although entertaining feels like a ‘watered-down for the masses’ version of a topic that I know people spend their lifetime’s trying to perfect. Although I don’t speak Klingon, I respect the franchise and was disappointed at the simplistic (often trading true character growth and dynamic for witty one-liners) nature of some of the characters. I am glad, however, that at least a new generation of viewers will be introduced to the characters. Hopefully those who enjoyed the movie will research the series in the proper manner.

Ogenec
“No one does geek-pop chic better than J.J. Abrams. I never watched Alias (dunno why), but I am hooked — hooked! — on Lost and Fringe. Unlike many TV auteurs, J.J.’s vision adapts quite well to the big screen too: see, for example, MI:III, the best movie of the trilogy.

So I was really excited when I heard that J.J. would be doing the reboot of Star Trek. I knew it’d be edgy, yet fun. I knew it would mix in enough of the mythology for the hardcore Trekkies, but also introduce some fresh elements. And I knew there would be a very good mix of bombastic action sequences and intelligent dialogue. I knew all of that. And yet, I was completely blown away by the movie. The dialogue was even better than I’d hoped. The interplay between the characters (like Bones and Kirk, or Scotty and Kirk, and most importantly Kirk and Spock themselves) was just phenomenal. The action was totally kick-ass. In fact, I’m about to unleash my id by watching it again tonight with the subwoofers set to “Stun.” But, above all else, two things really endear this movie to me as a total keeper. The first is the subversion of the operating premise of the Kirk-Spock relationship, where Kirk is the impulsive one, and Spock is all logic and rationality. In the movie, Kirk proves himself to be quite the thinking man, and Spock gets very emotional. Man, I ate it up. You will too, on the off-chance that you haven’t seen this excellent movie yet.

The second is the casting of Chris Pine as Kirk. Sometimes you hear the casting choices and you go “Hell Naw!!! What were they thinking?!?!?” Most times, your concerns are well-founded. Think George Clooney as Batman — ’nuff said. But sometimes, you’re just totally wrong, and you have to admit it. So I admit it — Chris Pine is such an inspired choice for Kirk that he seems borne for the role, just as much as Daniel Craig is, to me, now the definitive James Bond. All I knew of Chris Pine was his role as a homicidal maniac in Smoking Aces. Fantastic role, and he’s obviously quite the actor. But I couldn’t see how THAT guy could pull off a Captain Kirk. Well, I’m extremely happy J.J. Abrams doesn’t listen to me. And, by the way, Eric Bana also is fantastic as Spock’s Romulan nemesis. In short, fantastic movie. Can’t wait for the sequel.”

Audiegrl
“Loved it. J.J. Abrams did a outstanding job of re-energizing the Star Trek franchise. With 21st century special effects, he really updated, the normally slow-moving action viewers were used to. Spock and Lt. Uhura hooking up? Brilliant…we get to see what made Spock who he is, and his ongoing struggle to determine if he was more human or vulcan. It was also good to learn why Doctor McCoy aka Bones, earned his nickname, saying…“My wife took everything in the divorce, all she left me was my bones.” Abrams successfully introduced the series to a new generation of Trekkies, somewhere out there, Gene Roddenberry is smiling 🙂

Did You Know?

Randy Pausch, a Carnegie-Mellon Computer Science professor (and “Star Trek” fan) who gained widespread fame as the author of a “Last Lecture” in which he discussed living the life of his dreams in the face of terminal pancreatic cancer, was invited by J.J. Abrams to appear as an extra in this film (he is the Kelvin officer who says “Captain, we have visual“). Pausch wrote in his blog about the experience, “I got a custom-made Star Trek uniform and my own station on the bridge, where I had lots of buttons and controls. I even got a LINE!!!!” Pausch died on July 25, 2008; his paycheck of $217.06 from working on the film was donated to charity.

While most Trekkies will have known this detail for decades, this is the first time that Uhura has been given a first name on screen: Nyota. Gene Roddenberry never came up with a first name for her, so many thought this meant she did not have one, although in literature, Uhura is often referred to as Nyota by her comrades, and she is also referred to as Nyota Uhura in the DC Comics publication “Who’s Who in Star Trek“. There are several nods to this history in the movie: first, when Kirk first meets (and hits on) Uhura in a bar and tells her, “if you don’t tell me your name, I’m gonna have to make one up,” and then when she refuses to tell Kirk her first name throughout the film.

Majel Barrett, the wife of “Star Trek” creator Gene Roddenberry, has a role in this film as the voice of the Enterprise computer. She completed her voice-over work two weeks before her death on December 18, 2008.

The Korean-American actor John Cho was initially uncertain about being cast as the Japanese-American officer Hikaru Sulu, but George Takei, who played Sulu in “Star Trek” (1966), encouraged him to take the role as Sulu was a character who represented all of Asia.

Four Nominations

Best Visual Effects
Best Sound Mixing
Best Sound Editing
Best Makeup

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Filed under 82nd Academy Awards, Best Makeup, Best Sound Editing, Best Sound Mixing, Best Visual Effects, Culture, Entertainment, Hollywood, Pop Culture, Television, TV Shows, Uncategorized, US, Video/YouTube, World

Lopez Tonight! Guest Schedule for 02/08 thru 02/11

Posted by: Audiegrl


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Monday, February 8, 2010

Jaime FoxxJamie Foxx
Garry Marshall
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Tuesday, February 9, 2010

Topher Grace
Jewel
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Wednesday, February 10, 2010

Ashton Kutcher
Emma Roberts
Carter Jenkins

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Thursday, February 11, 2010

Jennifer Garner
Héctor Elizondo
Steel Magnolia

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Great Live Music Clip from Last Week’s Show

Matt Morris is an American singer-songwriter. The son of country music star Gary Morris, Morris made his show business debut on stage with his father. Morris is openly gay and married his husband Sean Michael Morris when same sex couples were allowed to do so in California. His husband was his inspiration for the song “Love” found on his debut album.

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Filed under Culture, Dancing, Entertainment, Gay (LGBT) Rights, George Lopez, Hispanic/Latino/Latina, Hollywood, Humor, Lopez Tonight, Los Angeles, CA, Media and Entertainment, Movies, Music, Networks, News, Pop Culture, Sports, TBS, Television, TV Shows, Uncategorized, Valentine's Day, Video/YouTube

Shoshana Johnson Pens Her Story In “I’m Still Standing”

Posted by guest contributor: Shanti

Shoshana Johnson poses for a picture in New York, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2010

Shoshana Johnson poses for a picture in New York, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2010 (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

“In March of 2003, when Operation Iraqi Freedom was only days old, world headlines were made when a U.S. army convoy was attacked in the city of An-Nasiriyah en route to Baghdad. Several soldiers were killed and others were taken prisoner.

Jessica Lynch became the face and name associated with this tragedy, but another female soldier, Shoshana Johnson, was also wounded and captured in the ambush. A video of Shoshana being interrogated by her captors was soon broadcast on Spanish-language television and then picked up by American media. Shoshana had become the first black female prisoner of war in United States history. She was held for twenty-two days.

When Shoshana returned to the United States, she received numerous awards for her valor, including the Bronze Star, Purple Heart, and Prisoner of War medals. She appeared on news networks and national television shows such as Oprah, Ellen, The Tonight Show, and Larry King Live, but she was bound by a military gag order. She was unable to discuss what really happened in Iraq — until now.

Shoshana holds nothing back in this harrowing account of an ordinary woman caught in an extraordinary circumstance. She reveals decisions made by higher-ups that may have led to the capture, describes the pain of post-traumatic stress disorder, and shares the surprising story of how a specialist in a maintenance company ended up on the front lines of war.

Divulging personal emotions and frustrations while raising fresh political issues, I’m Still Standing is the never-before-told and much anticipated story of the headline-making ambush, capture, and rescue described with the exceptional bravery and candor of a single mom and soldier who became an American hero. Source

CNN’s Larry King Live ~ Transcript of Interview with Shoshana Johnson aired February 2, 2010

KING: We welcome Shoshana Johnson back to LARRY KING LIVE. She is a veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom. She and other members of the 507th Maintenance Company were taken captive March 23, 2003. She was held prisoner 22 days. Author of a terrific new book I’m Still Standing; From Captive US Soldier to Free Citizen, My Journey Home.”

Before we get into this, what do you make of the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell controversy?

SHOSHANA JOHNSON, FORMER POW: Silly. If men and women want to serve in our military, I really don’t care who they want to sleep with. It’s all about serving your country.

KING: So you would repeal it?

JOHNSON: Yes, definitely.

KING: It’s been seven years since you were a POW. Do you think about it a lot?

I'm Still Standing by Shoshana JohnsonJOHNSON: Still. Very much so. The conflict in Afghanistan and Iraq is still in the media, so it’s hard to forget.

KING: How were you caught?

JOHNSON: During an ambush, vehicles were disabled. Basically, it seemed like the whole city of Nazariyah came out and participated in the ambush. I was shot and — shot and caught, basically.

Read the entire transcript here
Read a sample chapter

Shoshana Johnson tells her side of the story to Matt Lauer of The Today Show

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Shoshana Johnson actually said she wanted to tell her story, because there were a lot of distortions and half truths about the details of her capture. She wanted to set the record straight. I appreciate Shoshana’s resolve and passion for not only surviving the trauma of being a POW, but her courage and drive to THRIVE.~Shanti

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Filed under African-Americans, Army, Books, CNN, Culture, Entertainment, History, Iraq, Larry King, Larry King Live!, Marines, Media and Entertainment, Middle East, Military, NBC, News, Politics, Television, Terrorism, The Today Show, TV Shows, Uncategorized, United States, Veterans, Video/YouTube, War, Women's Issues

A Star Is Born

Written by: BlueDog89


One of the brightest stars to appear on the Hollywood scene in 1929 was a golden knight gripping his mighty sword while standing atop a reel of film with five spokes. His greatest role has been to honor outstanding achievements in filmmaking. His name is Oscar®.

For one of the most recognized trophies the world over, the statuette’s dimensions are not nearly as imposing as the overwhelming emotions experienced by the individuals honored by a nomination or receiving the award itself. Oscar® is a mere 13 ½” and weighing 8 ½ lbs., standing regally atop a base of a film reel. The five spokes displayed on the black base represent the original branches of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences®: Actors, Writers, Directors, Producers, and Technicians.

Cedric Gibbons and Dolores del Rio

Cedric Gibbons and Dolores del Rio

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer’s chief art director Cedric Gibbons was responsible for the design of the trophy. Gibbons’ wife, actress Delores del Rio, introduced him to Mexican film director Emilio “El Indio” Fernandez to pose for the original sketches. Sculptor George Stanley, renowned for designing the Muse Fountain at the Hollywood Bowl, sculpted Gibbons’ sketches and Sachin Smith cast the statuette in 92.5% tin and 7.5% copper and then gold-plated it. The only addition to Oscar since its original design was a minor streamlining of the base.

The original award presented at early ceremonies was gold-plated solid bronze. The statuette’s material changed over the years, such as during World War II, when there was a metal shortage, and the Oscars® were made of painted plaster. Once the war was over, wartime recipients were allowed to redeem their plaster figurines for gold-plated metal figures. Today Oscar® is constructed of gold-plated britannium on a black metal base rendered in an Art Deco style.

The Academy® initially named the statuette the Academy Award of Merit®, however Oscar® is what it’s most known for. Many rumors surround how the nickname of Oscar came about. One of the most well known is that of Bette Davis saying that the award resembled her first husband, band leader Harmon Oscar Nelson. Davis supposedly mentioned the term Oscar® when she received her Best Actress award for Dangerous in 1935. Walt Disney was rumored to use the moniker in 1932, and Time magazine made mention of Oscar® in 1934. The Authorized Version from the Academy® is based on a popular story about an Academy® librarian who remarked that the statuette resembled her Uncle Oscar. The Academy® officially adopted the nickname in 1939. However the name came about, it stuck. And many people today often refer to the award ceremony as The Oscars®.

From left to right: Douglas Fairbanks Sr., D.W. Griffith, Mary Pickford, and Charles Chaplin, around the time they founded United Artists in 1919

From left to right: Douglas Fairbanks Sr., D.W. Griffith, Mary Pickford, and Charles Chaplin, around the time they founded United Artists in 1919

The first Academy Awards®, hosted by actor Douglas Fairbanks Sr. and screenwriter/director from the silent film era William C. DeMille, were presented on May 16, 1929, at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, and lasted a mere 15 minutes. This was the only Academy Award® ceremony not to be broadcast either on radio or television. This was also the first and only year that the Academy® recognized two best pictures and the only time that winners were recognized for more than one movie. It was also the only time a silent movie reached best picture status.

Wings, Best Picture winner 1927

Wings, Best Picture winner 1927

Films that had been released between August 1, 1927 and July 31, 1928 were eligible for awards. Unlike later ceremonies, awards could be granted to an actor or director for multiple works within a year. The movie Wings, which starred the popular silent film star Clara Bow, won Best Picture, while Emil Jannings won Best Actor for two separate roles and Janet Gaynor won Best Actress for three separate roles. There were two Best Director Awards, Lewis Milestone won for Best Comedy and Frank Borzage won for Best Dramatic Picture.

Two special awards were also presented that night. One to Warner Brothers for producing The Jazz Singer and one to Charlie Chaplin for writing, acting, directing and producing The Circus.

Yet today, no matter what you call the glam evening of a 1,000 stars or the gleaming knight holding a crusader’s sword, it all represents the best in Motion Picture achievement. Only now The Oscars® come complete with bright lights, designer dresses, and the all-important red carpet.

It may be a little different from what the early founders of the Academy® had in mind; but we wouldn’t have it any other way.

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Filed under 82nd Academy Awards, Culture, Entertainment, History, Hollywood, Media and Entertainment, Movies, Pop Culture, Television, TV Shows, Uncategorized