Tag Archives: spirit

TV Crew Interpreter Rescues Baby Winnie From Rubble in Haiti

Posted by: Audiegrl

Winnie is passed to Australian journalist Mike Amor

Winnie is passed to Australian journalist Mike Amor

After hearing many experts say that no one could survive more than three days without water, today we learned a lesson about the power of faith. An Australian television crew interpreter pulled a 16-month-old girl, Winnie Tilin, from the rubble of a house in Haiti on Friday, January 15, nearly three days after a 7.0 magnitude earthquake devastated the country.

In the ruins of a neighborhood, where a hillside collapsed, residents were desperately trying to dig out a young child who was crying under the rubble. She had been buried there for 68 hours with no food or water. Hearing her faint cries and concerned that rescue efforts were taking to long, a young man jumped into the concrete hole. Deiby Celestino was the TV crew’s interpreter from the Dominican Republic. Miraculously, after crawling over dead bodies to get to her, he was able to pull her out. Once free, he passed the child to Australian journalist Mike Amor.

Miracle baby, Winnie

Miracle baby, Winnie

It’s very emotional. I actually thought it was my own baby pulling out there,” said hero/rescuer Celestino “She did a great job staying alive for three days with no food or drink.

Once the child was pulled from the rubble, volunteers poured water over the girl. “Whose baby? Whose baby? Is it your baby?” asked Amor who passed the child to her Uncle. Unfortunately, Winnie’s parents were killed in the collapse of the family’s home. Her Uncle, Frantz Tilin, arrived to find her after losing his own pregnant wife in the earthquake.

Workers with Save the Children Fund fed Winnie and gave her fresh water to drink. STC medical experts determined the girl to be dehydrated, but expect her to recover well.

This is truly a story of the resilience of the human spirit and an example of a self-less act of heroism by a fellow human being.


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More Stories of Hope…

Amazing rescue as two-year-old boy is pulled from wrecked home in Haiti

A little boy named Redjeson Hausteen Claude, was saved by a Spanish emergency worker whose team have managed to reach the afflicted area.

A little boy named Redjeson Hausteen Claude, was saved by a Spanish emergency worker whose team have managed to reach the afflicted area.

A TWO-YEAR-OLD boy is plucked from the rubble of his home three days after it was destroyed by the Haiti earthquake.

Redjeson Hausteen Claude’s saviour Felix del Amo could not conceal his glee as he handed the child to his parents, Daphnee Plaisin and Reginald Claude.

Spanish and Belgian rescuers had listened to Redjeson’s fading cries as they dug for hours through twisted metal and concrete.

The tearful tot’s face broke into a huge smile as he clapped eyes on his mum and dad, who had tried to dig him free with their bare hands.

Amazingly, he had suffered only a few facial cuts.

Dramatic photographs captured the moment when the father of Redjeson saw a Spanish rescuer pull his terrified child from the wreckage: Click Image for Slide-show


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Filed under Charity, Children, Countries, Disaster, Earthquake, Haiti, Media and Entertainment, Port au Prince, Video/YouTube, Women's Issues

44-D Book Diaries with Audiegrl: Evie Rhodes’ The Forgotten Spirit

The Forgotten Spirit by Evie RhodesToday’s interview features award-winning gospel songwriter, script writer and nationally best-selling author Evie Rhodes, discussing her timeless classic holiday novel The Forgotten Spirit – A Christmas Tale. A remarkable story filled with the traditions and the spirit of Christmas, just in time for the holiday season.

In The Forgotten Spirit, Rhodes introduces a special girl who is wise beyond her years and blessed with a unique and magical gift. Jamie is no ordinary nine-year-old, but a girl who has been chosen to bring back the love and remembrances that have long been forgotten amid the harsh realities of the world in which she lives…

This heart warming novel is about love, new beginnings, and the amazing power of hope. After all, Christmas is a time for miracles…


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AG: I’ve read that you had a career as a Gospel Hip-Hop artist as Prophecy 1. You were also a songwriter and video scriptwriter. How did you move from music into the publishing field?

EV: It was a very natural path for me, because I considered making music and doing music videos a form of storytelling as well. So for me to move from there to being a novelist, just meant that I had a larger ground to tell stories.

AG: Were you always interested in writing fiction?

EV: I wasn’t, it’s not something I was conscious of for a very long time. Then when I did begin to do a lot of writing, many of the things I wrote just naturally seemed to gravitate to that arena.

AG: How would you describe The Forgotten Spirit? The story has been recently compared to a Christmas classic along the lines of Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. How do you see the story?

EV: I see The Forgotten Spirit as a family story that can be embraced by everyone. A story that has warmth, that will have a very long life-span, because it has all the elements of humanity. It has all of the things that we all strive for and want in our lives everyday. The hope, the joy and the peace…those are elements that all people can relate to. Those are things we all, in one way or another, aspire to have in our lives.

AG: Who is the audience for The Forgotten Spirit? Is it more for young adults, or did you intend for it to be the same audience as your other novels?

EV: I didn’t write for a particular audience, it really is a family story than encompasses four generations. The young people, adults and elders are all together in this novel.

AG: What do you hope your readers get from The Forgotten Spirit?

EV: I really hope that my readers come away with something…whatever that something is…that they need to obtain. At the end of the day, only that reader knows what that something is. Something that is meant for them specifically. Overall I want them to enjoy the story and feel that they’ve been someplace different than their own lives.

AG: So far, what has been the reception from the public for the novel?

EV: Phenomenal. It’s truly a blessing. I’ve been getting letters from people in various parts of the country. People from all different backgrounds, tell me how inspired they are by the story. They tell me how the story brings back memories of Christmases past that they had forgotten.

AG: Now that the holiday season is upon us, what would you like people to take away from your novel?

EV: Giving. I consider The Forgotten Spirit the gift that keeps on giving. I hope that my readers will take a moment this season to just give one thing that they may not have given, or haven’t given in a long time. Just give one thing to someone else, or do something for someone else. Just because it’s a good thing to do. They will realize that sometimes, when we give to other people, it may enhance that person’s life, no matter how small it is.

Evie Rhodes began performing her combination of Gospel and Hip-Hop in churches in New York City. She wrote and performed as Prophecy 1 on the album Standing In Da Spirit, which received two awards from Real Blues Magazine for Best Gospel Album and Best Gospel Video for the song Changed. It was also awarded the Canadian Music Award for Best Gospel Album. Her other novels include ‘Street Vengeance‘, ‘Out “A” Order‘, ‘Expired‘ and ‘Criss Cross

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44-D Book Diaries with Audiegrl: Susan L. Taylor’s All About Love

Today’s interview features Susan L. Taylor, discussing her profoundly inspirational and thought-provoking book, All About Love: Favorite Selections from ‘In The Spirit’ on Living Fearlessly.

All About Love is a gathering of Susan’s favorite In the Spirit essays, as well as the favorites of many Essence readers. Several themes reoccur ~ finding harmony with ourselves and others; shedding the old skin of anger and bitterness; opening the heart and soul fully to love; wealth building and abundance; commitment to personal and social change; strengthening our families and communities; and primarily, keeping faith and finding the face of God in all our challenges. These are the principals and values that embody the wisdom Susan tries to live each day.

Susan L. Taylor is synonymous with Essence magazine, the brand she built—as its fashion and beauty editor, as editor-in-chief and editorial director. For 27 years she authored of one of the magazine’s most popular columns, In the Spirit. For nearly three decades, as the driving force behind one of the most celebrated Black-owned businesses of our time, Susan Taylor is a legend in the magazine publishing world.

She was the first and only African-American Woman to be recognized by the Magazine Publishers of America with the Henry Johnson Fisher Award—the industry’s highest honor—and the first to be inducted into the American Society of Magazine Editors Hall of Fame. She is the recipient of the NAACP President’s Award for visionary leadership and has honorary degrees from more than a dozen colleges and universities.

A fourth-generation entrepreneur, Susan grew up in Harlem working with her father in his women’s clothing store. She founded her own cosmetics company, a first for Black women, which led to the beauty editor’s position at Essence. She is the author of four books: In the Spirit: The Inspirational Writings of Susan L. Taylor; Lessons in Living; Confirmation: The Spiritual Wisdom That Has Shaped Our Lives, which she coauthored with her husband, Khephra Burns; and her most recent, All About Love, Favorite Selections from In the Spirit on Living Fearlessly. She is a much sought-after speaker, inspiring hope and encouraging us to reclaim our lives and create sustainable communities.

AG: Susan, start by telling our readers about All About Love.

ST: These writings are my and Essence readers favorite “In the Spirit” columns, which I have rewritten and deepened. Essentially, they are to help us remember that we are not weak or incomplete, but more than enough. We are human and divine and with our mind, we can create the joyful, peaceful and prosperous life God created us to have. All About Love is our encouragement to cast off negativity, doubt or fear–they grow when we give them power–and keep on stepping toward our goals and plans with walk-on-water faith.

AG: What inspired you to create this collection of essays?

ST: For years, Essence readers have been asking me to compile the ones that have been most helpful to them in a single volume. I also wanted to be able to read the ones that are most meaningful to me, the truths that have saved my life and that I must remember and practice to keep balance and inner peace at the center of my crazy-busy life.

AG: You founded a mentoring program called National CARES Mentoring Movement. Can you tell us about this project and what motivated you to create it?

ST: This is the painful truth we can no longer avoid addressing: Of all African-American births, 6.6 percent are to girls under the age of 18. Among our children, 58 percent of Black 4th graders are functionally illiterate. In some cities, nearly 80 percent of Black boys aren’t finishing high school.

Everyday more than a thousand Black children are arrested. One in every eight Black men between the ages of 25 and 29 is incarcerated, and the leading cause of death for our Black boys is homicide. What I and people all over the country are saying is, “Hell no! Not on our watch.” Millions of our young are in peril and the negative forces claiming them–the mothers and fathers of our tomorrows–are more powerful than our community’s or country’s effort to secure them. The goal of the National Cares Mentoring Movement is to put a caring and loving adult in the life of every vulnerable child and to increase the rate of high school graduation among Black youngsters by 10 percent annually. Now there are 22 cities at various stages of launching local movements. Already in operation are Atlanta Cares Mentoring Movement, Chicago Cares, Memphis Cares, Baltimore Cares, and the fearless brothers of MADD DADS are organizing the state of Florida.

AG: Being the “face” of Essence magazine for a number of years, you left the magazine to work on building the National Cares Mentoring Movement. Was this a difficult decision for you?

ST: It’s time for the next generation to take the reigns of Essence. They are energized, well trained and hard working. At times we older ones hold on too long. I did what I came to Essence to do; my 37 years there have seasoned me well. Now I’m ready for the heavy lifting, for even tougher, mightier work–linking arms and aims with the many caring people throughout the nation who have a passion for justice and understand that neither public policy nor political will is going to rescue our young and that this is our call to commitment, Black people’s work to do.

AG: What are your long-term goals for the National CARES Mentoring Movement?

ST: Oprah Winfrey put out the call for one million people to sign on to mentor. She devoted a show to the National CARES Mentoring Movement and ran it twice within a month. This gave the movement a tremendous life. Mentoring costs nothing and saves lives. We asking every able, stable Black person to devote four hours a month in a one-to-one mentoring relationship, or to with a group of friends mentor a number of youngsters–say those in a group home. Not only do mentees benefit, mentors grow in ways that are immeasurable.

The long-term goal, is ending the carnage in our communities, the over-incarceration of our young and turning every failing public school into a top-tier, safe learning environment that young people want to be a part of. Also, the leaders of the four national Baptist convention, that together have over 16 million congregants, have agreed to encourage churches to open their doors after school and enlist retired teachers to offer homework help, and on Saturdays for the accurate teaching of our history. We need our women and men to organize their congregations in churches, temples and mosques to do this critical work. This is the overarching goal.

National CARES Mentoring MovementAG: Where can our readers find more information on joining this movement?

ST: Readers can log on to National CARES Mentoring Movement for more information and to sign up to mentor. Just enter your zip code and a list of mentoring opportunities in your area will appear on the screen. Select one that appeals to you, investigate it and sign on.

AG: Are you working on any other upcoming projects?

ST: I am working on a healing and stress-reducing meditation CD. And a book about how we sisters and brothers can build solid lasting relationships is in my heart. All of my work is in synergy. We need inner peace and we need to get along with one another in order to secure the children and rebuild our communities. Peace and love begin in our individual hearts and homes, then we can live and build together well. We have to practice forgiveness and non-judgment every day. This is the most difficult and most necessary walk we humans must take. The most revolutionary thing we Black folks can do is learn to love one another.

AG: Name one thing that the world does not know about Susan L. Taylor~the person?

ST: Many folks think I have it all together all the time. Life is a school room, and I am learning how to listen to my life and my own intuition. When I don’t, things fall apart, I get depressed, lose faith and suffer. Them I turn to a wisdom book, or someone who helps me remember this: Magnify God, not the perceived obstacle. We combine with whatever we focus on. “God’s ways are ingenious; God’s methods are sure.” Each day I’m learning to trust God more and more.

Please visit the National CARES Mentoring Movement website and watch Susan and Oprah discuss the movements inspirational success stories.

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