Tag Archives: pitch

President Obama Throws Out First Pitch

Posted by: Audiegrl

President Barack Obama is congratulated by kids on the sidelines at Nationals Stadium moments after he threw out the first pitch before the game between the Philadelphia Phillies and the Washington Nationals on Opening Day at Nationals Park on April 5, 2010 in Washington, DC. (Photos by Pool/Getty Images North America)

EUR~It went wide right, but at least President Obama’s ceremonial first pitch to launch the 2010 Major League Baseball season found the glove of Washington Nationals third baseman Ryan Zimmerman without taking a bounce.

Dressed in a red Nationals jacket and khakis, the president stopped to greet wounded veterans before walking out to the mound amid lots of cheers and some audible boos at Nationals Park today.

The left-hander then pulled out a White Sox cap to represent his home team, placed it firmly on his head and wound up for the pitch.

The wild throw was perhaps an over-compensation for the opening toss at last year’s All-Star game in St. Louis, when Cardinals first baseman Albert Pujols saved him the embarrassment of a short hop by moving up to scoop the low pitch inches off the ground.

Obama, an avid basketball player who has said baseball does not come naturally to him, prepared for Monday’s opener by throwing practice pitches to aides at the White House.

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Filed under Baseball, Pres. Barack Obama, Uncategorized, Video/YouTube

First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden at World Series

Posted by Audiegrl

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Michelle Obama, Jill Biden, Yogi Berra and Capt. Tony Odierno

There are two additions to the lineup for tonight’s opening game of the World Series at Yankees Stadium: Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden.

The first wives will participate in ceremonies honoring Welcome Back Veterans, accompanied by Yankees legend Yogi Berra, and West Point graduate and Iraq War veteran Tony Odierno.

Odierno, who lost his left arm in the Iraq War, is an operations employee at Yankees Stadium. Berra served in the Navy during World War II.

world-series-live-stream-schedule2009We are looking forward to welcoming the First Lady and Dr. Biden to Yankee Stadium and Game One of the 2009 World Series,” said Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig, “We hope their presence at both the game and the hospital visit will be an inspiration to the veterans, who proudly served our country.”

Mrs. Obama and Dr. Biden, along with several members of the Yankees, will visit patients at the James J. Peters VA Medical Center in the Bronx.

Long before their husbands became President and Vice President, the two women have made veterans and military families a central priority. Mrs. Obama has visited Fort Bragg to talk to military families twice since the President took office. Dr. Biden is a Blue Star Mom – the Vice President’s son Beau Biden recently returned from a tour of duty in Iraq.

Tonight’s game in New York highlighted the work of welcomebackveterans.org, an organization that has awarded $5.8 million in grants to non-profit agencies across the country targeting veterans’ greatest needs, including mental health and job training/placement.

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Michelle Obama and Jill Biden Support Our Veterans

First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden express their support for our returning heroes, and ask all Americans to get involved.

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Filed under Democrats, Military, Politics, Sports

First Lady Michelle Obama Makes Chicago Olympic Bid in Copenhagen

Posted by: Audiegrl

U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama talks with Prince Albert of Monaco at a reception following the opening Ceremony of the 121st IOC Session at the Copenhagen Opera House on October 1, 2009 in Copenhagen, Denmark. The 121st session of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) will vote on October 2 on whether Chicago, Tokyo, Rio de Janeiro or Madrid will host the 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo by Charles Dharapak-Pool/Getty Images)

After arriving in Copenhagen, Denmark on Wednesday morning, First Lady Michelle Obama addressed a crowd at Chicago Mayor Daley’s welcome reception.

REMARKS BY THE FIRST LADY

AT MAYOR DALEY’S WELCOME RECEPTION

Admiral Hotel

Copenhagen, Denmark

8:03 P.M. CEST

MRS. OBAMA: Thank you, everybody. So, as my husband would say, we are fired up and ready to go in here. (Applause.) It’s a good thing. Well, first let me begin by thanking my dear friend, my chit-chat buddy, Oprah Winfrey. She talks about me coming here without hesitation. This is a woman who’s got a pretty busy schedule – taping shows, traveling across the globe, a woman with a full plate. I think that folks out there should understand how Chicagoans, even those who weren’t born and raised here, feel a passion about the city, so much so that we dropped everything – dropped everything – to be a part of this team. So I want to give Ms. Winfrey a round of applause as well. (Applause.)

One reporter asked me in a press briefing, “So, what do you think Oprah adds to the team?” I said, “Oprah is Oprah.” (Laughter.) What more do you have to say? I said every single city who’s bidding wishes they had Oprah on their team, and we have her, and we are grateful that she is a part of this endeavor. (Applause.)

It is so nice to see so many familiar faces. I mean, we really do miss Chicago. We’ve made a wonderful home in D.C. The girls are great; Grandma is good. Bo is no longer a puppy; he’s a big dog now. (Laughter.) But it’s wonderful to reconnect to my hometown.

When I looked at the bid initially, I was overwhelmed by what a beautiful concept was presented. You know, everything about this bid speaks to what the city has to offer. Having the Games right along that beautiful, glorious lakefront; using the existing park structure to ensure that we’re making the kinds of investments and we’ll have the kind of wonderful leave-behinds that will benefit the city over the long run; the notion that Olympic athletes who visit the city will live centrally, they’ll be 15 minutes from any competition site, that they’ll be able to walk, ride or bus to some of the greatest cultural offerings that this nation, that this world has to offer – it will be an athlete’s paradise in so many ways, and we will have it at a time in the city’s climate that will actually be nice. (Laughter.) The lake won’t be frozen over.

So I am thrilled. I am proud of our bid, and I am proud of this team. And I have to ask you, are we ready to go with this, right? You ready to go? (Applause.)

This bid also means a lot to me personally because, as First Lady, as many of you know, I’ve made it a priority to bridge the gap between the White House and communities across D.C. and across the country. I’ve spent much of my first nine months trying to open the doors to the White House to kids who might not otherwise see themselves having access to these institutions, because that’s where I came from – communities like that where kids never dreamed that they could set foot in the White House, let alone live there.

So I’ve wanted to open the doors of the White House and bring new opportunities to so many young kids – kids living in the midst of power and prestige, fortune and fame, but never really seeing their connections to those institutions.

And Barack and I made a point of doing the same thing when we lived in Chicago – making the concerns of kids in all sorts of communities our own, because we have been on both sides of that bridge. In so many ways, we have lived full lives on both sides of that bridge. And for me, this is one of the best reasons I can think of to bring the Olympics to our city.

We need all of our children to be exposed to the Olympic ideals that athletes from around the world represent, particularly this time in our nation’s history, where athletics is becoming more of a fleeting opportunity. Funds dry up so it becomes harder for kids to engage in sports, to learn how to swim, to even ride a bike. When we’re seeing rates of childhood obesity increase, it is so important for us to raise up the platform of fitness and competition and fair play; to teach kids to cheer on the victors and empathize with those in defeat, but most importantly, to recognize that all the hard work that is required to do something special.

I remember watching the Olympics when I was little. I remember it to the T, some of those memories. And Nadia Comaneci is here, who – (applause) – and so many incredible Olympic athletes. But I remember, I told this story, when you scored that perfect 10, you bounced off the balance beam, off the parallel bars. I thought I could do that. (Laughter.) I didn’t know then that I would be 5’11”. (Laughter.)

But it was – it was an activity in our household when it was time for the Olympic Games, all of us gathered around the TV cheering on and being inspired by people who were doing things that were beyond belief. And I just think, wouldn’t it be great if that kind of spirit was happening right down the street in our community? Just think of that. Kids and communities across the city, in Austin, kids who grew up in Cabrini, kids who live so far from the city. Now just imagine if all of that was happening right in their own backyard. That’s what I think about. (Applause.)

It does something to a kid when they can feel that energy and power up close and personal. And for some kids in our communities and our city, around the nation, around the world, they can never dream of being that close to such power and opportunity. So that’s what excites me most about bringing the Games to Chicago – the impact that it can have on the lives of our young people, and on our entire community.

And I know that’s what all of you have been working for for these past few months. As much of a sacrifice as people say this is for me or Oprah or the President to come for these few days, so many of you in this room have been working for years to bring this bid home, and you have put together a phenomenal set of ideas that, no matter what the outcome is, we should be proud of as a city. (Applause.)

So now is the time for us to pull it through, you know. As Barack and I have looked at this, this is like a campaign. (Laughter.) Just like Iowa. (Laughter.) You got to – and the international community may not understand that, but Iowa is like a caucus, and you can’t take any vote for granted. Nobody makes the decision until they’re sitting there.

So the next few days really provide us with a real opportunity to hold some hands, to have some conversations, to share our visions, to make the world understand that this is an opportunity for the United States to connect to the world in a really important way at a very critical time, and for each of us to show them our passion and sincerity to be part of the world in a very special way, and to let people know that we understand that sports saves lives, that it makes dreams come true, that it creates visions in kids’ heads to make them think they can be the next David Robinson, the next Barack Obama, the next Nadia Comaneci, the next Oprah Winfrey. Those dreams have to start somewhere, and for so many, they start when they watch the Olympics. And if we can show people that we understand that power and that possibility, then they will have the confidence that not only will we have the city – the Olympics in a city that works, but will execute this thing with the kind of passion and openness and sincerity that the world so greatly wants to see in us.

So let’s get it done. Thank you so much.

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Filed under Chicago, IL, Culture, Entertainment, Europe, Fashion, First Lady Michelle Obama, History, Media and Entertainment, Politics, Pop Culture, Uncategorized, Women's Issues, World

Justice Sonia Sotomayor Has Quite an Arm!

Posted by Buellboy

Justice Sonia Sotomayor, a long time Yankee fan, got to throw out the ceremonial pitch during the game between the Yankees and the Boston Red Sox.

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Filed under Culture, Hispanic/Latino/Latina, Sports, Supreme Court, Uncategorized