Tag Archives: paintings

Giant Cattle To Be Bred Back From Extinction

Posted by: Audiegrl

Aurochs were immortalized in prehistoric cave paintings and admired for their brute strength and “elephantine” size by Julius Caesar

Aurochs

Aurochs are depicted in ochre and charcoal in paintings found on the walls of cave galleries such as those at Lascaux in France Photo: ALAMY


Telegraph.co.uk/Nick Squires~~But despite their having gone the way of the dodo and the woolly mammoth, there are plans to bring the giant animals back to life.

The huge cattle with sweeping horns which once roamed the forests of Europe have not been seen for nearly 400 years.

Now Italian scientists are hoping to use genetic expertise and selective breeding of modern-day wild cattle to recreate the fearsome beasts which weighed around 2,200lb and stood 6.5 feet at the shoulder.

Breeds of large cattle which most closely resemble Bos primigenius, such as Highland cattle and the white Maremma breed from Italy, are being bred with each other in a technique known as “back-breeding“.

At the same time, scientists say they have for the first time created a map of the auroch’s genome, so that they know precisely what type of animal they are trying to replicate.

We were able to analyse auroch DNA from preserved bone material and create a rough map of its genome that should allow us to breed animals nearly identical to aurochs,” said team leader Donato Matassino, head of the Consortium for Experimental Biotechnology in Benevento, in the southern Campania region.

We’ve already made our first round of crosses between three breeds native to Britain, Spain and Italy. Now we just have to wait and see how the calves turn out.

More @ telegraph.co.uk

Click the images to enlarge

Advertisements

3 Comments

Filed under Animals, Art, Computers, Culture, England, France, Genetics, History, Media and Entertainment, News, Sciences, Spain, Technology, Uncategorized, Wildlife

Noel Coward’s Star Quality to Light Up Academy Gallery

Posted by: Audiegrl

Noel Coward by Edward Sorel

Noel Coward by Edward Sorel

Star Quality: I don’t know what it is, but I’ve got it,” said Noel Coward in his inimitable style, cigarette in hand and a twinkle in his eye. The life and career of playwright, composer, director and actor Noel Coward will be celebrated by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in a new touring exhibition, “Star Quality: The World of Noel Coward,” opening on Saturday, January 23, in the Academy’s Fourth Floor Gallery in Beverly Hills. Admission is free.

Coward is well known as the creator of such stage classics as Hay Fever, Private Lives, Cavalcade, Design for Living and Blithe Spirit, many of which were adapted for film, and as the composer of such timeless songs as “I’ll See You Again,” “Mad About the Boy” and “Mad Dogs and Englishmen.” “Star Quality” will be the first exhibition to show the full extent of Coward’s talents as a director of plays and movies, a stage and film actor, songwriter, cabaret artist, wartime patriot, painter and patron of charitable causes.

Noel Coward and stage partner Gertrude Lawrence 1936

Noel Coward and stage partner Gertrude Lawrence 1936

With unparalleled access to the Coward Archives, and drawing on public and private collections in Europe and the U.S. as well as the Academy’s Margaret Herrick Library, the exhibition brings together dozens of rare photographs, drawings, paintings, original manuscripts, letters, sheet music, posters, playbills, set and costume designs, personal memorabilia, audio and video clips, and original costumes, including several of the silk dressing gowns that became Coward’s trademark. Coward’s friendships with many of the 20th century’s leading artists and film personalities also are documented throughout the exhibition, as are his contributions to the film world through his on-screen appearances and the numerous film adaptations of his stage work.

Noel Coward and Judy Garland 1951

Noel Coward and Judy Garland 1951

Star Quality: The World of Noel Coward,” is presented in association with the Noël Coward Foundation and the Museum of Performance & Design in San Francisco. The Academy’s installation has been guest curated by Brad Rosenstein and Rosy Runciman; the original exhibition was conceived and developed at Ten Chimneys by Erika Kent. Rosenstein will lead a public gallery talk at the Academy on Saturday, January 23, at 3 p.m. No reservations are required.

Star Quality: The World of Noel Coward” will be on display through Sunday, April 18. The Academy’s Fourth Floor Gallery is located at 8949 Wilshire Boulevard in Beverly Hills and is open Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and weekends, noon to 6 p.m. For more information call (310) 247-3600 or visit http://www.oscars.org.

Stephen Fry, Michael York and Pat York attend the opening of the exhibition Star Quality: The World of Noel Coward presented by The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences at the Academys Fourth Floor Gallery in Beverly Hills on Friday, January 22, 2010

Stephen Fry, Michael York and Pat York attend the opening of the exhibition Star Quality: The World of Noel Coward presented by The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences at the Academys Fourth Floor Gallery in Beverly Hills on Friday, January 22, 2010

44-D’s Virtual Red Carpet to the Oscars® Main PageBack to 44-D’s Virtual Red Carpet to the Oscars® Main Page

Leave a comment

Filed under 82nd Academy Awards, Art, Artists, Culture, Dancing, England, Entertainment, Gay (LGBT) Rights, History, Hollywood, Los Angeles, CA, Media and Entertainment, Movies, Music, Musicals, Philanthropy, Plays, Pop Culture, Television, Uncategorized, United States, Video/YouTube

Intrigue in Pebble Beach– a curious case of art theft 

posted by GeoT

Pebble Beach California, Click above for full sized image

Pebble Beach California, Click above for full sized image



By Scott Herhold

Eleven days ago, two Pebble Beach men reported an extraordinary art theft that has become more extraordinary as the news has dribbled out. The pair told Monterey County

Two Pebble Beach residents say this painting by Miro was stolen... ( Courtesy of Angelo Amadio )

Two Pebble Beach residents say this painting by Miro was stolen... ( Courtesy of Angelo Amadio )

sheriff’s deputies that thieves had broken into their expensive rental home and taken more than $60 million of art, including works by Jackson Pollock, Rembrandt, Matisse and Miro.

If the owners’ estimates were correct, the theft may be second in value only to the most famous 1990 heist at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, where thieves posing as policeman tied up two guards and escaped with works by Rembrandt, Vermeer and Degas. That theft, which has never been solved, has been pegged at $300 million.

Stolen drawing described as Dutch Woman by Vincent Van Gogh

Stolen drawing described as 'Dutch Woman' by Vincent Van Gogh

But an odd reaction has come from the art world. In my reporting, I’ve detected skepticism about aspects of the crime, particularly about the lack of insurance and the finding of a ransom note a few days after sheriff’s deputies combed through the house. “No one in their right mind brings a collection like that to a private home without security,” said Thomas McShane, an ex-FBI agent who has written a book about art theft and contends that the Pebble Beach report raises red flags.
“You have to have those works in a secure facility. You’re jeopardizing the integrity of the art by leaving them around unsecured.”

Two Pebble Beach residents say this drawing by Renoir was stolen

Two Pebble Beach residents say this drawing by Renoir was stolen

The men who reported the theft, Angelo Benjamin Amadio, 31, and retired oncologist Dr. Ralph Kennaugh, 62, both recently arrived in California from Boston and describe themselves as “business partners.” They told deputies that thieves apparently climbed through an unlocked window at their $5 million rental home on Sunridge Road, a stucco-and-stone villa with a view of the ocean.

Then, a week ago, came a bombshell. The men announced that a ransom note — which included a death threat — had been found in the home, apparently missed in the initial search. The sheriff’s department put out a release saying the disclosure of this evidence to the media might have compromised the “integrity of the investigation.” A round of finger-pointing ensued.

Cont’d: Here.

Leave a comment

Filed under Art, Crime, Greed, Law, Money, True Crime, Violence