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80 Best Picture Posters to Premiere at the Academy

Posted by: Audiegrl

The Wizard of Oz movie posterThe Wizard of Oz,” “Citizen Kane” and “Casablanca” will be among the 80 Best Picture nominees represented in the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ new exhibition “The More the Merrier: Posters from the Ten Best Picture Nominees, 1936 – 1943,” opening on Saturday, January 23, in the Academy’s Grand Lobby Gallery in Beverly Hills. Admission is free.

Focusing on the eight consecutive years during which there were annually ten Best Picture nominees, the exhibition will showcase what are arguably some of the most striking movie posters ever created, including artwork for “Romeo and Juliet” (1936), “A Star Is Born” (1937), “Jezebel” (1938), “Stagecoach” (1939), “The Philadelphia Story” (1940), “The Maltese Falcon” (1941), “The Pride of the Yankees” (1942) and “Heaven Can Wait” (1943). Key artists and illustrators whose work will be featured include Norman Rockwell, Al Hirschfeld, Jacques Kapralik, France’s Boris Grinsson and Pierre Pigeot, and Italy’s Ercole Brini.

The exhibition also will present the only known three-sheet posters for “The Great Ziegfeld” (1936), the special British cinema display for “Lost Horizon” (1937), and an original painting for “Gone with the Wind” (1939) by the prolific artist Sergio Gargiulo.

Gone With the Wind movie posterThe More the Merrier” is drawn from the collection of Academy member and poster art director Mike Kaplan, and augmented by materials from the Academy’s Margaret Herrick Library. The posters include foreign versions from South American and Europe.

The specific number of Best Picture nominees ranged from 3 to 12 in the Awards years from 1927/28 through 1943; in 1944 the number was set at 5, as it remained until 2009. The 82nd Academy Awards®, which will be televised on Sunday, March 7, will return to the Academy’s past practice of nominating 10 films for the Best Picture award.

Kaplan will lead a public gallery talk at the Academy on Sunday, January 24, at 3 p.m. No reservations are required.

The More the Merrier: Posters from the Ten Best Picture Nominees, 1936 – 1943” will be on display through Sunday, April 18. The Academy’s Grand Lobby Gallery is located at 8949 Wilshire Boulevard in Beverly Hills and is open Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and weekends, noon to 6 p.m. For more information call (310) 247-3600 or visit www.oscars.org.

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Noel Coward’s Star Quality to Light Up Academy Gallery

Posted by: Audiegrl

Noel Coward by Edward Sorel

Noel Coward by Edward Sorel

Star Quality: I don’t know what it is, but I’ve got it,” said Noel Coward in his inimitable style, cigarette in hand and a twinkle in his eye. The life and career of playwright, composer, director and actor Noel Coward will be celebrated by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in a new touring exhibition, “Star Quality: The World of Noel Coward,” opening on Saturday, January 23, in the Academy’s Fourth Floor Gallery in Beverly Hills. Admission is free.

Coward is well known as the creator of such stage classics as Hay Fever, Private Lives, Cavalcade, Design for Living and Blithe Spirit, many of which were adapted for film, and as the composer of such timeless songs as “I’ll See You Again,” “Mad About the Boy” and “Mad Dogs and Englishmen.” “Star Quality” will be the first exhibition to show the full extent of Coward’s talents as a director of plays and movies, a stage and film actor, songwriter, cabaret artist, wartime patriot, painter and patron of charitable causes.

Noel Coward and stage partner Gertrude Lawrence 1936

Noel Coward and stage partner Gertrude Lawrence 1936

With unparalleled access to the Coward Archives, and drawing on public and private collections in Europe and the U.S. as well as the Academy’s Margaret Herrick Library, the exhibition brings together dozens of rare photographs, drawings, paintings, original manuscripts, letters, sheet music, posters, playbills, set and costume designs, personal memorabilia, audio and video clips, and original costumes, including several of the silk dressing gowns that became Coward’s trademark. Coward’s friendships with many of the 20th century’s leading artists and film personalities also are documented throughout the exhibition, as are his contributions to the film world through his on-screen appearances and the numerous film adaptations of his stage work.

Noel Coward and Judy Garland 1951

Noel Coward and Judy Garland 1951

Star Quality: The World of Noel Coward,” is presented in association with the Noël Coward Foundation and the Museum of Performance & Design in San Francisco. The Academy’s installation has been guest curated by Brad Rosenstein and Rosy Runciman; the original exhibition was conceived and developed at Ten Chimneys by Erika Kent. Rosenstein will lead a public gallery talk at the Academy on Saturday, January 23, at 3 p.m. No reservations are required.

Star Quality: The World of Noel Coward” will be on display through Sunday, April 18. The Academy’s Fourth Floor Gallery is located at 8949 Wilshire Boulevard in Beverly Hills and is open Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and weekends, noon to 6 p.m. For more information call (310) 247-3600 or visit http://www.oscars.org.

Stephen Fry, Michael York and Pat York attend the opening of the exhibition Star Quality: The World of Noel Coward presented by The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences at the Academys Fourth Floor Gallery in Beverly Hills on Friday, January 22, 2010

Stephen Fry, Michael York and Pat York attend the opening of the exhibition Star Quality: The World of Noel Coward presented by The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences at the Academys Fourth Floor Gallery in Beverly Hills on Friday, January 22, 2010

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44-D’s Haunted Library


hauntedlib

Welcome to the 44-D’s Haunted Library. Just in time for Trick-or-Treat the Scary Scribes Scream-Out. The selections here are guaranteed to make you sleep with the lights on!

Please feel free to nominate books in the comments section. I had to cut myself off at some point~~Audiegrl 😉


Hellbound HeartsHellbound Hearts by Clive Barker, et al…

As editor/author John Skipp says in the foreword of the newest zombie short stories collection, there is just something scarier about the horror genre in the written word. That something is the reader’s imagination. This anthology celebrates Hellraiser creator Clive Barker and the merciless world of the demonic Cenobites he created.
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Strain-Book-One-TrilogyThe Strain-Volume One by Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan

They have always been here. Vampires. In secret and in darkness. Waiting. Now their time has come. In one week, Manhattan will be gone. In one month, the country. In two months — the world. (yes, that Guillermo Del Toro)
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wwzthumb2World War Z by Max Brooks

An ‘oral history’ of the global war the evil brain-chewers came within a hair of winning. Zombies are among us—turn on your television if you don’t believe it. But, Brooks reassures us, even today, human fighters are hunting down the leftovers, and we’re winning. Look for the movie in 2010. If this guy is not the conceptual artist for the film, there is something wrong in the universe.
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evilatheartthumbEvil At Heart by Chelsea Cain

Chelsea Cain’s novels featuring Portland detective Archie Sheridan and serial killer Gretchen Lowell have captivated fans through two nail-biting entries, Heartsick and Sweetheart, both of them multiweek bestsellers in The New York Times, USA Today, and Publishers Weekly. Hey, when characters from True Blood start reading your books, its on…
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blackhousethumbBlack House by Stephen King and Peter Straub

Follow up to The Talisman, Retired cop Jack Sawyer takes on the territories again when strange murders start happening. If you are familiar with a turn of the century serial killer named Albert Fish, then you will be prepared for this chilling story.
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floatingdragonthumbFloating Dragon by Peter Straub

The quiet suburban town of Hampstead is threatened by two horrors–one is natural, the unstoppable creation of man’s power gone mad. The other is not natural at all–and makes the first look like child’s play. This one is a yearly must-read for me.
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iamlegendthumbI Am Legend by Richard Matheson

A survivor of a modern apocalypse kills vampire like creatures during the day and barricades himself in at night for protection. Ok, maybe you caught the cheesy Charlton Heston version or the Will Smith hi-tech version of the movie. Doesn’t matter. This is the guy who wrote the book back in the 50’s. He influenced Stephen King and the horror genre. Anything written by Matheson is bank.
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everylastdropthumbEvery Last Drop by Charlie Huston

Just imagine a world where New York City is divided by vampire clans who each have different reasons to hate PI Joe Pitt. Huston creates a world that is at once supernatural and totally familiar, imaginative, and utterly convincing. Just think Elmore Leonard with fangs.
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thestandthumbThe Stand: Expanded Edition by Stephen King

The Stand…you either love it or hate it, but you can’t ignore it. Stephen King’s most popular book, according to polls of his fans, is an end-of-the-world scenario: a rapidly mutating flu virus is accidentally released from a U.S. military facility and wipes out 99 percent of the world’s population, thus setting the stage for an apocalyptic confrontation between Good and Evil. Remember folks, this is just fiction.
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thehistorianthumbThe Historian by Elizabeth Kostova

A motherless 16-year-old girl stumbles upon a mysterious book and papers dating back to her father’s student days at Oxford. The unnamed heroine uncovers an academic quest that begins with her father’s mentor’s first research into the history of Vlad Tepes (Dracula) and reaches a kind of conclusion many years later.
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thegirlnextdoorthumb2The Girl Next Door by Jack Ketchum

The books introduction is written by Stephen King who said, “The Girl Next Door is alive…in a way most works of popular fiction never attain; it does not just promise terror but actually delivers it.” Also, the fact that its based on a true story makes it even more disturbing.

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reddragonthumb2Red Dragon by Thomas Harris

Lying on a cot in his cell with Alexandre Dumas’s Le Grand Dictionnaire de Cuisine open on his chest, Hannibal “The Cannibal” Lecter makes his debut in this legendary horror novel, which is even scarier than its sequel, The Silence of the Lambs. Why? you may ask…Just one word…teeth

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heartshappedboxthumbHeart-Shaped Box by Joe Hill

Before you crack open this chilling thriller, you might want to rethink your nighttime habits… Hill’s story about an aging rock star (with a penchant for macabre artifacts) who buys a haunted suit online will scare you silly. But don’t take my word for it… Oh, did I mention that his dad is Stephen King? Enough said.

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thestorethumbThe Store by Bentley Little

The novel builds paranoia by starting with simple descriptions of the picturesque landscape and the deceptively banal Western town that is Juniper, Arizona. Then The Store arrives. The pattern of delight and worry in the citizens, as The Store spreads its tentacles into local concerns, is believable–disturbingly so. Trust me, after reading this, you will never look at WalMart the same again.

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