Tag Archives: jefferson

Breaking News: Bill Clinton Hospitalized for Chest Pain


4:23 CST~President Bill Clinton was rushed to the Columbia Campus of New York Presbyterian Hospital in Manhattan today after experiencing chest pain.

Douglas Band, a counselor for the 63-year-old former President, says he is in “good spirits” and released the following statement:

“Today President Bill Clinton was admitted to the Columbia Campus of NY Presbyterian hospital after feeling discomfort in his chest.

Following a visit to his cardiologist, he underwent a procedure to place 2 stents in one of his coronary arteries.

President Clinton is in good spirits and will continue to focus on the work of his Foundation and Haiti’s relief and long-term recovery efforts.”

The statement continues, “In 2004, President Clinton underwent a successful quadruple bypass operation to free four blocked arteries.”

UPDATE: Secretary of State Hilary Clinton has announced that she’s on her way from Washington to be with Bill.

Story developing…

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    Hope for Haiti Now: A Global Benefit for Earthquake Relief” Video highlights

    Thanks to everyone who joined us for a night of great music and a show of support for the people of Haiti

    Posted by: Audiegrl

    Hope for Haiti Vodpod videos no longer available.Hope for Haiti Now Vodpod videos no longer available.Hope for Haiti Now Vodpod videos no longer available. Hope for Haiti Now Vodpod videos no longer available.Hope for Haiti Now Vodpod videos no longer available. Hope for Haiti Now Vodpod videos no longer available.Hope for Haiti Now Vodpod videos no longer available. Hope for Haiti Now Vodpod videos no longer available. Hope for Haiti Now Vodpod videos no longer available. Vodpod videos no longer available.

    President Obama Signs Legislation

    President Obama Signs Legislation Providing Immediate Tax Deductions for Haiti Charitable Contributions January 22, 2010.

    President Obama Is Making It Easier for Americans to Support Haiti
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    In the days since the earthquake in Haiti, Americans have shown their generosity with millions of dollars in donations. Tonight, President Obama signed a bill into law that makes it easier to give. This legislation will allow taxpayers to receive the tax benefit from donations made to the Haiti effort in this tax season, rather than having to wait until they file their 2010 tax returns next year. Specifically, cash donations to charities for the Haitian relief effort given after January 11 and before March 1 of this year may be treated as if the contribution was made on December 31 of last year so that the contribution can be deducted from 2009 income. This measure applies to monetary donations, not goods or services.


    Clinton Bush Haiti Relief FundUNICEFAmerican Red Cross

    WFP:  World Food ProgrammePartners In Health Oxfam America
    Yéle Haiti

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    Welcome to 44’D’s Happy Holiday’s Special

    We here at The 44 Diaries would like to say Thank You for participating in our blog and we hope that you all have a happy holiday and a prosperous new year. We also hope that you get to spend plenty of time with the people you love the most…

    Please note: We will be keeping this up all week in celebration, but will be posting political news in the top section next to ‘Home’.


    History of Christmas




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    Origins and Traditions of Hanukkah

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    Celebrating Kwanzaa



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    Santa Claus Through History



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    Famous and Not-So Famous Christmas Movies List

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    The History of Christmas at the White House 1789-2009

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    Twenty-Five Days of Christmas Music Videos

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    Christmas Around the World



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    Fun Filled Christmas Facts



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    Christmas in the Age of Dickens

    Christmas in the Age of Dickens



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    Amazing Christmas Truce of 1914



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    Holiday Season at the White House with the Obama’s 2009




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    The History of Christmas at the White House 1789-2009

    Like any other Americans, the family living in the big white house on Pennsylvania avenue has traditions surrounding the holiday season as well. Sit back, and get comfortable, while we explore how Presidents have celebrated Christmas from President George Washington to President Barack Obama.

    A special note of thanks goes to our friends at White House Christmas Cards, for allowing us to use some of their outstanding research material as part of this presentation. If you are interested in a more in-depth study of Christmas in the White House, we highly recommend you visit their site.

    Christmas is not a time nor a season, but a state of mind. To cherish peace and goodwill, to be plenteous in mercy, is to have the real spirit of Christmas. ~ President Calvin Coolidge

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    History of Christmas at the White House (1789-1849)



    President George Washington and First Lady Martha (1789-1797)
    President John Adams and First Lady Abigale (1797-1801)
    President Thomas Jefferson (1801-1809)
    President James Madison (1809-1817)
    President James Monroe and First Lady Elizabeth (1817-1825)
    President John Quincy Adams and First Lady Louisa (1825-1829)
    President Andrew Jackson and First Lady Rachel (1829-1837)
    President Martin Van Buren (1837-1841)
    President William Henry Harrison and First Lady Anna (1841-1841)
    President John Tyler and First Ladies Lettitia and Julia (1841-1845)
    President James K. Polk and First Lady Sarah (1845-1849)
    President Zachary Taylor and First Lady Margaret (1849-1850)


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    History of Christmas at the White House (1850-1901)

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    President Millard Fillmore and First Ladies Abigail and Caroline (1850-1853)
    President Franklin Pierce and First Lady Jane (1853-1857)
    President James Buchanan (1857-1861)
    President Abraham Lincoln and First Lady Mary (1861-1865)
    President Andrew Johnson and First Lady Elizabeth (1865-1869)
    President Ulysses S. Grant and First Lady Julia (1869-1877)
    President Rutherford B. Hayes and First Lady Lucy (1877-1881)
    President James A. Garfield and First Lady Lucretia (1881-1881)
    President Chester A. Arthur and First Lady Ellen (1881-1885)
    President Grover Cleveland and First Lady Francis (1885-1889, (1893-1897)
    President Benjamin Harrison and First Lady Caroline and Mary (1889-1893)
    President William McKinley and First Lady Ida (1897-1901)


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    History of Christmas at the White House (1901-1953)

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    President Theodore Roosevelt and First Ladies Alice and Edith (1901-1909)
    President William Howard Taft and First Lady Helen (1909-1913)
    President Woodrow Wilson and First Ladies Ellen and Edith (1913-1921)
    President Warren G. Harding and First Lady Florence (1921-1923)
    President Calvin Coolidge and First Lady Grace (1923-1929)
    President Herbert Hoover and First Lady Lou (1929-1933)
    President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and First Lady Eleanor (1933-1945)
    President Harry S. Truman and First Lady Bess (1945-1953)


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    History of Christmas at the White House (1953-1977)

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    President Dwight Eisenhower and First Lady Mamie Eisenhower (1953-1961)
    President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy (1961-1963)
    President Lyndon Johnson and First Lady Claudia (Lady Bird) (1963-1969)
    President Richard Nixon and First Lady Patricia (1969-1974)
    President Gerald Ford and First Lady Betty (1974-1977)

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    History of Christmas at the White House (1977-2009)

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    President Jimmy Carter and First Lady Rosalyn Carter (1977-1981)
    President Ronald Regan and First Lady Nancy (1981-1989)
    President George HW Bush and First Lady Barbara (1989-1993)
    President William J. Clinton and First Lady Hillary (1993-2001)
    President George W. Bush and First Lady Laura Bush (2001-2008)
    President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama (2009- )


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    The History of Christmas at the White House 1789 thru 1849

    President George Washington and First Lady Martha 1789-1797

    George Washington was sworn in as the first President of the United States on the balcony of Federal Hall in New York City. There was no White House at that time so the Washington’s lived in houses that were “borrowed” as Presidential homes, first in New York City and later in Philadelphia.

    At a time when Christmas was still quite controversial in a new nation, at the time Martha Washington’s holiday receptions were stiff and regal affairs, quite befitting the dignity of the office of President of the United States and invitations were much desired by the local gentry. A Christmas party was given by the Washington’s for members of Congress on Christmas Day, 1795 at which a bountiful feast was served to the guests, all men with the exception of the First Lady.

    The 2009 Mount Vernon Holiday Ornament

    The 2009 Mount Vernon Holiday Ornament

    Although not everyone celebrated Christmas in the colonies, the festivities at Washington’s Mount Vernon plantation in Virginia would start at daybreak with a Christmas fox hunt. It was followed by a hearty mid-day feast that included “Christmas pie,” dancing, music, and visiting that sometimes did not end for a solid week. This, of course, is in stark contrast to the Christmas of 1777, spent by General Washington and his troops at Valley Forge where dinner was little more than cabbage, turnips, and potatoes.

    Some documents show that Christmas at Mt. Vernon were quite a celebration. The traditional feast varied from household to household (depending on how wealthy the family was) but generally, consisted of wines, rum punches, hams, beef, goose, turkey, oysters, mincemeat pies, and various other treats. The season was considered a grown-up celebration, but presents would generally be given to children. Irena Chalmers notes that in 1759, that George Washington gave the following presents to his children: a bird on Bellows; a Cuckoo; a Turnabout Parrot; a Grocers Shop; an Aviary; a Prussian Dragoon; a Man Smoking; a Tunbridge Tea Set; 3 Neat Books, a Tea Chest. A straw parchment box with a glass and a neat dressed wax baby.

    President John Adams and First Lady Abigale 1797-1801

    When the second President of the United States, John Adams, moved into what would come to be known as the White House, the residence was cold, damp, and drafty. Sitting at the edge of a dreary swamp, the First Family had to keep 13 fireplaces lit in an effort to stay comfortable. It is in this setting that the cantankerous president held the first ever White House Christmas party in honor of his granddaughter, Susanna. It could be said that the invitations sent for this party were the very first White House Christmas cards, though in those early days, the building was referred to as the President’s Palace, Presidential Mansion, or President’s House.

    Peacefield, the Quincy, Massachusetts home and farm of John Adams, where he spent Christmas with his family before and after his presidency

    The affair was planned in large part by the vivacious First Lady, Abigail Adams, and was considered a great success. A small orchestra played festive music in a grand ballroom adorned with seasonal flora. After dinner, cakes and punch were served while the staff and guests caroled and played games. The most amusing incident of the evening occurred when one of the young guests accidentally broke one of the First Granddaughter’s new doll dishes. Enraged, the young guest of honor promptly bit the nose off of one of the offending friend’s dolls. The amused president had to intervene to make sure the incident didn’t turn any uglier.

    The 2009 John Adams Administration Christmas Ornament

    The 2009 John Adams Administration Christmas Ornament

    With the death of George Washington shortly before Christmas of 1799, President Adam’s Federalist Party was weakened. Due in part to the unpopularity of the Alien and Sedition Acts, he narrowly lost his re-election bid to Thomas Jefferson, 65 to 73 in the Electoral College. Adams retired to a life of farming at Peacefield, his home near Quincy, Massachusetts. In 1812, Adams reconciled with Thomas Jefferson. He sent a brief note to Jefferson, which resulted in a resumption of their friendship and began an ongoing correspondence that lasted the rest of their lives.

    President Thomas Jefferson 1801-1809

    Since Christmas did not become a national holiday until 1870 during the administration of Ulysses S. Grant, it is not surprising that the exchanging of White House Christmas cards was not a yearly presidential custom during the very early history of our country. For most of our earlier presidents, there is very little documented information regarding Christmas celebrations or traditions they or their families may have practiced. However, whether it is because he was a prolific letter-writer or that scholars have accumulated a wealth of information on his life from painstaking research, there is more information describing Christmas celebrations of our third president, Thomas Jefferson, than any of our other Founding Fathers who became president. This information reflects both the time Jefferson spent as president in the White House and at his famous Virginia home and plantation, Monticello.

    Monticello, the Virginia home and plantation of Thomas Jefferson, where he celebrated many Christmas seasons with his family before and after his presidency

    As president in 1805, six of his grandchildren and 100 of their friends – invited by Secretary of State James Madison’s wife, Dolley, who acted as official hostess – made for a tremendously enjoyable holiday party at which Jefferson played the violin for the dancing children. Christmas celebrations at the Jefferson White House were festive affairs where delicacies and local American foods were served. Joyful Christmas partying continued at Monticello in 1809 following the end of the Jefferson presidency earlier that year. Celebrations at Jefferson’s beautiful home included social intercourse amongst friends and relatives and the serving of a Christmas favorite, mince pies. The hanging of Christmas stockings and the decorating of evergreen trees had not yet become the norm like those traditions are today.

    2004 American President Collection Thomas Jefferson Ornament

    2004 American President Collection Thomas Jefferson Ornament

    In all that he did, Jefferson tried to maintain his political and moral philosophy, not only for the country itself, but also for America’s citizens. He believed that each person has “certain inalienable rights,” which could not be taken away whether a government existed or not. He also believed in equality for all people and was a proponent of states’ rights.
    Thomas Jefferson died on July 4, 1826 along with fellow Founding Father and 2nd President, John Adams). Ironically, this date was also the 50th anniversary of the adoption of Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence, the document which historians readily believe is perhaps the most important document in our country’s history.

    President James Madison 1809-1817

    President James Monroe and First Lady Elizabeth 1817-1825

    Monroe, a Virginian who is considered the last of the United States’ Founding Fathers, was, however, one of the participants in what may be the most famous Christmas in our nation’s history.

    It was on Christmas in 1776 that Monroe, a lieutenant in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War, was wounded in the shoulder serving with General George Washington in the surprise attack against the Hessians at the Battle of Trenton in New Jersey. In fact, in the famous 1851 painting by German-American artist Emanuel Leutze, it is the young James Monroe who is shown holding the flag as Washington leads his men into battle as their boat crosses the Delaware River from Pennsylvania into New Jersey. Had the exchanging of Christmas cards been a custom back in Colonial times, certainly none would have been exchanged between the pro-British Hessians and the revolution-minded colonists!

    The famous painting by Emanuel Leutze featuring George Washington leading his troops across the Delaware on Christmas of 1776. Future President James Monroe is depicted holding the American flag.

    The famous painting by Emanuel Leutze featuring George Washington leading his troops across the Delaware on Christmas of 1776. Future President James Monroe is depicted holding the American flag.

    In modern times, at the James Monroe Museum in Fredericksburg, Virginia, not only is there an annual exhibition showcasing what the Monroe home would have looked like at Christmastime, but other festivities include fireworks, a display of Christmas dishes such as candied fruits and plum pudding, and decorations which include mistletoe, ivy, and holly.

    In 1831 James Monroe died from tuberculosis and heart failure one year later on the 4th of July – the third president of the first five in our country’s history to pass away on the date of the birth of our nation.

    President John Quincy Adams and First Lady Louisa 1825-1829

    President John Quincy Adams spent four Christmases in the White House and yet there is very little written about his Christmas celebrations, if indeed there were any. He was a very prolific writer and there is certainly the possibility that he sent Christmas messages from the White House. Since Christmas cards were not in vogue until after the 1850s, we can be sure that President John Quincy Adams did not send out White House Christmas cards.

    President Adams appointed Joel R. Poinsett as the first U.S. ambassador to Mexico in 1825, who shortly thereafter brought back red, wild growing plants from the southern Mexican states. These red plants would be called poinsettia, the popular Christmas plant of today.

    President and Mrs. Adams lived vastly separate lives while in the White House. President Adams developed his love for gardening and Louisa raised silk worms. Perhaps, her intention was to make Christmas presents with the silk. Being the only foreign born first lady, Louisa had some bad publicity stirred up by opponents of her husband. Their son John was the only son of a president to be married in the White House on February 25, 1828. Louisa Adams was the first to allow visitors to tour the White House with the intention of proving that the First Family was not living in the lap of luxury at the expense of the taxpayers.

    President Andrew Jackson and First Lady Rachel 1829-1837

    During the 1835 Christmas season, a number of young relatives occupied the White House of President Andrew Jackson. His wife’s niece, her four children and the two children of his adopted son, Andrew Jackson, Jr., all made their residence in the executive mansion. The President and his family sent invitations, White House Christmas cards, of sorts, to the local children inviting them to an event in the East Room on Christmas Day.

    On Christmas Eve, President Jackson and the White House children embarked upon a carriage ride, delivering gifts to former First Lady Dolly Madison and Vice President Martin Van Buren. As they rode, one of the children asked the President if he thought Santa would visit the White House. Mr. Jackson replied that they would have to wait and see and told the children of a boy he once knew who had never heard of Christmas or Santa Claus and who had never owned a single toy. The boy, he told them, never knew his father and then his mother died. After her death, he had no friends and no place to live. Jackson and the children then visited an orphanage and delivered the remaining gifts in the carriage to its residents. Years later, one of the children, Mary Donelson, realized that the boy the president spoke of had been Jackson himself.

    The 2004 American President Collection Andrew Jackson Ornament.

    The 2004 American President Collection Andrew Jackson Ornament.

    That night, the President encouraged the children to hang their Christmas stockings in his bedroom and even allowed himself to be talked into hanging his own stocking for the first time in his 68 years. On Christmas morning, the children raced into Jackson’s chamber to see what St. Nick had left. They each received a silver quarter, candy, nuts, cake, and fruit in addition to a small toy. The President received slippers, a corncob pipe, and a tobacco bag.

    Later that day, the children who had received the White House Christmas card invitations arrived at the residence and found the East Room decorated with mistletoe and other seasonal foliage. They participated in song, games and danced throughout the afternoon. At dinnertime, the youngsters filed into the dining room two-by-two as the band played “The President’s March.” The French chef had created a remarkable feast including winter scenes filled with animals carved out of icing and confectionery sugar. Also featured were cakes shaped like apples, pears, and corn. In the center, there was a large pyramid of cotton “snowballs” – frosted creations which exploded when struck in a certain way.

    The Hermitage, the Nashville home of Andrew Jackson, where he spent several Christmas holidays following his stay in the White House

    After dinner, the children were allowed to participate in a wild snowball fight. While some of the adults feared that the festivities were getting out of hand, President Jackson cheered them on, taking great pleasure in their youthful enthusiasm.

    After two terms, Jackson retired to his estate, the Hermitage, outside Nashville, Tennessee. He remained a force in national politics and was instrumental in the elections of Democrats Martin Van Buren in 1836 and James K. Polk in 1844. He died from tuberculosis in 1845 at the age of 78.

    President Martin Van Buren 1837-1841

    President William Henry Harrison and First Lady Anna 1841-1841

    William Henry Harrison was not in the White House long enough to enjoy a Christmas season, serving only one month before he died. It is very clear that he did not send White House Christmas cards. The first known Christmas cards sold in the United States weren’t until 1843, two years after Harrison’s election in 1841. The custom of sending White House Christmas cards began officially with President Dwight D. Eisenhower, although many prior presidents sent Christmas cards to family and friends.

    President William Henry Harrison was portrayed in a 1991 Christmas ornament issued by the White House Historical Society. He was depicted atop a white charger in full military regalia. Harrison spent many years on the Northwest Frontier (as it was known in his time) probably spending Christmas with family or his troops. There is little written about President Harrison’s Christmas celebrations prior to his short tenure in the White House. There is little doubt that he would have followed his Episcopalian beliefs in any Christmas observances.

    Grouseland, the Northwest Frontier home of William Henry Harrison, where he spent many Christmas seasons before his short stint in the White House

    At the age of 67, William Henry Harrison became the oldest man elected as President of the United States until Ronald Reagan was elected in 1980. He won on the slogan “Tippecanoe and Tyler too” on the Whig ticket. The Harrison’s must have had a busy Christmas season in 1840 preparing to move to the White House.

    President Harrison gave the longest inauguration speech in history and had the shortest term. He was the first president to die in office. He served only 30 days before dying of pneumonia. His wife, Anna, never had a chance to be First Lady, but was given a widow’s pension of $25,000 and lifetime franking privilege. President William Henry Harrison was buried in Ohio and the Whig party died with him.

    President John Tyler and First Ladies Lettitia and Julia 1841-1845

    There were probably no White House Christmas cards sent at the beginning of the Tyler administration. There is no information whatsoever as to whether the Tyler family followed that present-day Christmas tradition, but it was not until 1843 – during the middle of the Tyler administration – that the first commercial Christmas cards were even commissioned. That card was quite controversial as it showed a family and their young child partaking of some wine drinking, a picture of which would have been scandalous had the Tyler’s sent out something similar as their White House Christmas cards. Although Christmas cards were not exchanged, it is known that President Tyler enjoyed hosting Christmas parties for young children.

    Married to wife Letitia since 1813, by 1839 she had become an invalid. After her husband acceded to the presidency, a daughter-in-law, Priscilla Cooper, became the President’s official hostess since the First Lady was not able to perform her official duties. On September 10, 1842, after a lengthy illness, Letitia died.

    An illustration of party for children thrown by President John Tyler, perhaps a Christmas party

    During the following year, the widower Tyler had taken notice of an outgoing and quite beautiful young woman named Julia Gardiner, daughter of Senator Daniel Gardiner of New York, whose family usually spent the winter social season in Washington. It was a special White House Christmas that followed as the President hosted a special Christmas Eve gathering of the Tyler and the Gardiner families. Their friendship turned into love in the succeeding months and the two were married on June 26, 1844.

    Serving as First Lady for only a little more than eight months until the end of her husband’s term, Julia made quite an impact during her short reign. At the age of 24 and 30 years younger than her husband, she was the youngest woman to serve as First Lady. Bringing gaiety and a youthful feel to the White House, she made sure that the song “Hail to the Chief” was played at state occasions and she also introduced the Waltz and Polka to White House dance festivities. The one Christmas Julia spent as White House hostess must have been one of joy and celebration.

    President James K. Polk and First Lady Sarah 1845-1849


    James K. Polk is considered by historians to be the last strong pre-Civil War president. In his one term, he nearly doubled the territory of the United States, strengthened the economic power of the federal government, promoted trade, and bolstered the power of the chief executive. While nearly all give him credit for greatly strengthening the nation, he is often criticized for his lack of a forward-looking vision on the issue of slavery.

    Polk accomplished the first two fiscal goals before the middle of his term. These policies were popular in the South and West, but not in Pennsylvania and much of the northeast. His first foreign policy victory came four days after Christmas of 1845, when Texas was admitted to the Union as the 28th state. This angered Mexico, which viewed the area as its own breakaway province. Avoiding a costly war, Polk reached an agreement with Great Britain to recognize the 49th parallel as the border between British Canada and the U.S., acquiring slightly more than half of the Oregon territory in the process. Acquisition of California and New Mexico would prove more difficult as the Mexican government refused Polk’s $20-30 million offer for the territories and by the spring of 1846, the nations would find themselves at war.

    The Tennessee home of President Polk where he celebrated Christmas with Mrs. Polk before taking up residence in the White House

    The Tennessee home of President Polk where he celebrated Christmas with Mrs. Polk before taking up residence in the White House

    The country expanded again when Iowa gained statehood three days after Christmas. Another important event in American history occurred about a week after the holiday season when The Philanthropist became The National Era, and declared itself the country’s leading anti-slavery periodical. A few years later, Harriet Beecher Stowe’s highly-influential novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, would first be published as a 40-week serial in The National Era, further stoking the abolitionist movement. A few weeks before Christmas of 1847, another influential anti-slavery publication first rolled off the presses when former slave Frederick Douglass published the North Star.

    President Zachary Taylor and First Lady Margaret 1849-1850


    Zachary Taylor served as the 12th President of the United States before dying in office after leading our nation for only 16 months. Having spent only one Christmas in the White House (1849), there is no information as to how the President and his family celebrated the holidays or whether they exchanged White House Christmas cards with friends and acquaintances.

    Indeed, First Lady Margaret Mackall Smith Taylor cared so little about performing the traditional social duties of a president’s wife that she would not have had a hand in sending out White House Christmas cards anyway. In fact, President Taylor was empathetic to his wife’s feelings of not wanting to take on the role of presidential spouse since his wife had endured a life of hardships as the spouse of a career military man. One of their daughters, newly-married Mary Elizabeth (Betty) Taylor Bliss, assumed her mother’s role at official functions and carried on in that capacity during President Taylor’s short term in office. Whether Betty Taylor Bliss had a hand in overseeing the exchange of White House Christmas cards is unknown as well.

    Kentucky boyhood home of Zachary Taylor where he spent Christmas with his seven brothers and sisters

    Kentucky boyhood home of Zachary Taylor where he spent Christmas with his seven brothers and sisters

    By the summer of the following year, during the final stages of the eventual agreement on the issue which became known as the Compromise of 1850, President Taylor died. At a ceremony on the 4th of July connected with the building of the Washington Monument and celebrating the 74th birthday of our country, the President drank a large amount of cold water along with cherries and iced milk to help overcome the high temperatures. After contacting gastroenteritis and suffering from a high fever that night, Taylor passed away four days later from a reported coronary thrombosis.

    Taylor’s death, however, has been clouded in controversy. Being a robust man in good health, historians have surmised that perhaps because of the controversy surrounding the country at that time, certain people upset with Taylor’s stance on slavery might have had reason to do him harm. In 1991, acting on the idea that Taylor was possibly poisoned, the former president’s body was exhumed, and hair and fingernail samples were taken. After testing, it was determined that there was arsenic present but the levels were too low to consider that Taylor – rather than Abraham Lincoln – had been the first president of the United States to have been assassinated.

    A special note of thanks goes to our friends at White House Christmas Cards, for allowing us to use some of their outstanding research material as part of this presentation. If you are interested in a more in-depth study of Christmas in the White House, we highly recommend you visit their site.

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    The History of Christmas at the White House (1977-2009)

    President Jimmy Carter and First Lady Rosalyn 1977-1981

    When Jimmy Carter decided to run for the Presidential Election of 1976, it was quite a shock to most seeing as he had very little name recognition throughout the United States. But the Democrat Georgia governor campaigned in 37 states, gave 200 speeches, and even gave a private interview to Playboy magazine. Running against President Ford, Carter won the popular vote by 2.1% and earned 57 more votes in the Electoral College. On January 20, 1977, Jimmy Carter was sworn in as the 39th President of the United States – the first man from the Deep South to be elected President since the election of 1848.

    First White House Christmas cards sent by President and Mrs. Carter in 1977

    First White House Christmas cards sent by President and Mrs. Carter in 1977

    For their first Christmas in the White House in 1977, The Carters asked Harvey Moriarty, a family friend, to draw a picture of the White House for their 1977 Christmas cards. Moriarty’s drawing, done in pen and ink, featured a view of the White House South Portico from the South Lawn. Hallmark lithographed the image on deckle-edged ivory paper. The imprint read, “With best wishes from our family for a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. The President and Mrs. Carter.”

    The extended Carter family wears personalized knit hats in this Christmas portrait.

    The extended Carter family wears personalized knit hats in this Christmas portrait.

    It was suggested by the Democratic National Committee that the President send Christmas cards to campaign workers and donors to express appreciation and maintain support for the 1980 campaign. So to make certain they would have enough holiday greetings to send out, President Carter and the First Lady ordered a whopping 60,000 White House Christmas cards from Hallmark that year! The President and Mrs. Carter also commissioned Hallmark to reproduce Moriarty’s White House drawing for their Christmas gift prints. Hallmark made up 5,000 prints, which were given out to the White House staff. Each print was inscribed with the title, “The White House-1977,” and contained signatures of both the President and First Lady.

    1980 White House Christmas cards from President Carter and First Lady Rosalynn Carter

    1980 White House Christmas cards from President Carter and First Lady Rosalynn Carter

    First Lady Rosalynn Carter explored a variety of holiday themes in her years at the White House. Her 1977 Blue Room tree featured painted milkweed pods, nut pods, foil and eggshell ornaments made by members of the National Association for Retarded Citizens. In 1978 Mrs. Carter decked an “antique toy” tree with Victorian dolls and miniature furniture lent by the Margaret Woodbury Strong Museum. In 1979 she honored American Folk Art of the Colonial period, asking students of the Corcoran School of Art to create imaginary symbolism pieces from balsa wood, fabric and dried flowers. She revisited a Victorian theme in 1980 with dolls, hats, fans, tapestries and laces. President and Mrs. Carter were “Sunday painters” who appreciated American art. Jimmy Carter first became interested in art history as an education officer in the Navy. In time, he and Rosalynn studied the great masterpieces together, “not to become experts,” she explained, “but for enjoyment.”

    President and Mrs. Carter with daughter Amy in front of The White House Christmas Tree in 1977

    President and Mrs. Carter with daughter Amy in front of The White House Christmas Tree in 1977

    In 1977, a surprise gift arrived for 10-year-old Amy Carter – a red, white and blue chain saw. A young friend of Amy’s had reported that the first daughter wanted a chain saw for Christmas because “she likes the way they work.” A White House spokeswoman later clarified, “I think Amy might have said ‘train set,’ not ‘chain saw.'” Nonetheless, more chain saws arrived.

    On December 18, 1980, President Carter lit his final National Christmas Tree. The tree stayed illuminated for only 417 seconds, each second symbolizing the total number of days that the American hostages were being detained in Iran. In his final Christmas greeting to the American people, the President talked about the hostage situation in Iran and the reasons why the tree was to remain unlit. At one point he said, “The hostage families asked me to do this year the same thing we did last year. And this is just to light the Star of Hope and to hold the other lights unlit until the hostages come home. And they also asked me to ask all Americans to continue to pray for the lives and safety of our hostages and for their early return to freedom…

    Christmas 1979 Statement by the President

    First Daughter Amy Carter pushes the button for the National Christmas Tree lighting ceremony in 1979

    First Daughter Amy Carter pushes the button for the National Christmas Tree lighting ceremony in 1979

    Rosalynn and I send our warmest Christmas greetings to those of our fellow citizens who celebrate this religious holiday.

    At this time of traditional joy and family festivity, as we join in thanking God for His blessings to us as a nation and as individuals, we ask that you offer a special prayer for the Americans who are being held hostage in Iran and for their families. We remember also the plight of all people, whatever their nationality, who suffer from injustice, oppression, hunger, war, or terrorism.

    May this Christmas season truly be the beginning of a time of peace among nations and good will among all peoples, and may the spirit of love and caring continue from this holy season through the coming year.~President Jimmy Carter

    President Ronald Regan and First Lady Nancy 1981-1989

    First Lady Nancy Reagan chose the themes for eight White House Christmas’s. Her official 1981 Blue Room tree was trimmed in ornaments lent by the Museum of American Folk Art. For all the following years, she arranged for the people of Second Genesis, a drug treatment program in D.C., Maryland and Virginia, to help decorate her trees. In 1982, they made foil paper cones and metallic snowflakes. These were reused in 1983 on a tree featuring old-fashioned toys lent by the Margaret Woodbury Strong Museum. In 1984, Second Genesis fashioned ornaments out of plant material to compliment natural pieces crafted by the Brandywine Museum in Pennsylvania.

    First Lady Nancy Reagan decorating the White House Christmas Tree in The Blue Room in 1981

    First Lady Nancy Reagan decorating the White House Christmas Tree in The Blue Room in 1981

    President Ronald Reagan caught Nancy Reagan under the “kissing ball” of mistletoe that hung in the Grand Foyer in 1981. But Reagan’s allergies couldn’t handle some of the other floral arrangements, and the plants had to be exiled to spots in the White House that the president rarely visited.

    For Christmas of 1985, the Reagan’s Executive Residence staff and Second Genesis made 1,500 ornaments from holiday cards sent to President Reagan in 1984. The residence staff and Second Genesis worked together for the next three holiday seasons.

    Dutchman Tree Farms provided the National Christmas Tree for President Ronald Reagan and First Lady Nancy

    Dutchman Tree Farms provided the National Christmas Tree for President Ronald Reagan and First Lady Nancy

    Christmas in Illinois, where both Ronald and Nancy Reagan grew up, was a sharp contrast to their Christmases in Washington. The President has recalled that his family never had a really fancy Christmas. During the Depression, when they couldn’t afford a Christmas tree, his mother would decorate a table or make a cardboard fireplace out of a packing box. The First Lady had fond childhood memories of her family’s old-fashioned tree decorated with all the ornaments she and her brother had made in school. Little Nancy would stay awake Christmas Eve listening for the sound of reindeer on the roof, waiting anxiously to see if she had received what she had requested in her letter to Santa.

    The 2004 American President Collection Ronald Reagan Ornament

    The 2004 American President Collection Ronald Reagan Ornament

    As First Lady, Nancy Reagan was much less dependent on Santa. “Christmas at the White House was truly magical,” she recalled. “The huge tree in the Blue Room was very beautiful; the trees in the East Room looked like they were standing in snow with tiny white lights on them.” President Regan sent a Christmas message to the country, “Nancy and I pray that this Christmas will be a time of hope and happiness not only for our nation but for all people of the world. Merry Christmas, and God bless you.

    President Ronald Reagan and First Lady Nancy Reagan stand in front of the White House Christmas Tree in 1987

    President Ronald Reagan and First Lady Nancy Reagan stand in front of the White House Christmas Tree in 1987

    To share the aura of the White House at Christmas, the Reagans decided to invite young artists to paint scenes of the Executive Mansion for their cards. During the President’s first term in office, they commissioned Jamie Wyeth to paint two exterior views of the White House at Christmas; they commissioned James Steinmeyer and Mark Hampton to do non-holiday renderings of the Red Room and the Green Room, respectively. For the second term in office, they settled on one artist, Thomas William Jones, and one theme, Christmas inside the White House. In his final Christmas wish for the nation, President Regan said, “Nancy joins me in wishing all Americans a Christmas of true peace and a New Year filled with happiness and joy.

    Message on the Observance of Christmas 1988

    President Regan and First Lady Nancy push the button to light the National Christmas Tree in 1988

    President Regan and First Lady Nancy push the button to light the National Christmas Tree in 1988

    The themes of Christmas and of coming home for the holidays have long been intertwined in song and story. There is a profound irony and lesson in this, because Christmas celebrates the coming of a Savior Who was born without a home.
    There was no room at the inn for the Holy Family. Weary of travel, a young Mary close to childbirth and her carpenter husband Joseph found but the rude shelter of a stable. There was born the King of Kings, the Prince of Peace—an event on which all history would turn. Jesus would again be without a home, and more than once; on the flight to Egypt and during His public ministry, when He said, “The foxes have holes, and the birds of the air have nests; but the Son of man hath no where to lay his head.” From His very infancy, on, our Redeemer was reminding us that from then on we would never lack a home in Him.

    First Lady Nancy Reagan and Santa aka Dom DeLuise, throw some artificial snow in the air during a press preview of White House decorations in 1987

    First Lady Nancy Reagan and Santa aka Dom DeLuise, throw some artificial snow in the air during a press preview of White House decorations in 1987

    Like the shepherds to whom the angel of the Lord appeared on the first Christmas Day, we could always say, “Let us now go even unto Bethlehem, and see this thing which is come to pass, which the Lord hath made known unto us.”
    As we come home with gladness to family and friends this Christmas, let us also remember our neighbors who cannot go home themselves. Our compassion and concern this Christmas and all year long will mean much to the hospitalized, the homeless, the convalescent, the orphaned—and will surely lead us on our way to the joy and peace of Bethlehem and the Christ Child Who bids us come. For it is only in finding and living the eternal meaning of the Nativity that we can be truly happy, truly at peace, truly home.
    Merry Christmas, and God bless you!
    ~President Ronald Regan

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    President Ronald Regan’s 1981 Christmas Greeting

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    1984 National Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony

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    President George HW Bush and First Lady Barbara 1989-1993

    First Lady Barbara Bush chose a theme of “family literacy” for the Blue Room tree of 1989. She had the Executive Residence staff create 80 soft-sculpture characters from literature. Tiny books completed the motif. In 1990, Mrs. Bush revisited “The Nutcracker” with little porcelain dancers. White House florists dressed the figurines, and a castle from the Land of Sweets was constructed by White House craftspeople. The Saintly Stitchers of St. Martin’s Episcopal Church in Houston, Texas, joined with the staff on the “needle work” tree of 1991. They created a needlepoint village and 92 needlepoint figures for a wooden Noah’s Ark built by staff carpenters. For the 1992 tree theme of “Gift-Givers,” White House florists fashioned 88 different “gift-giving” characters.

    1992 George H.W. Bush White House Christmas Card

    1992 George H.W. Bush White House Christmas Card

    Ever since “Poppy” Bush met Barbara Pierce at a Christmas party in December 1941, they had celebrated life together. Then, after 44 years of marriage, raising five children, losing a sixth to leukemia and moving 29 times, George and Barbara Bush relocated, with much fanfare, to 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

    They especially enjoyed celebrating Christmas at the White House with family and friends and the thousands of visitors who came each year to enjoy the beautiful Christmas sights and sounds with them. The First Lady added her own special touches to the holiday with her annual cherry picker ride to hang the star at the top of the National Christmas Tree, a trip she took 12 times beginning in the Reagan Administration as the wife of the Vice President.

    In 1984, First Lady Barbara Bush, assisted by Joseph Riley, president of the Christmas Pageant of Peace committee, placed the top ornament on the national Christmas tree on the Ellipse

    First Lady Barbara Bush

    In this photo taken Nov. 28, 1984, First Lady Barbara Bush, assisted by Joseph Riley, president of the Christmas Pageant of Peace committee, places the top ornament on the national Christmas tree on the Ellipse near the White House. In 1991, a needlepoint club of White House staff and volunteers made 1,370 needlepoint Christmas ornaments, some of which had a resemblance to the first lady. One six-inch angel was wearing a three-stranded pearl necklace and Mrs. Bush joked to reporters, “There are a lot of white-haired, fat, pearled ones.”

    President and Mrs. Bush in front of the 1992 White House Christmas tree.

    President and Mrs. Bush in front of the 1992 White House Christmas tree.

    Despite all the White House Christmas card history that had gone before, this First Family established four “firsts” in the cards they selected and sent: the first holiday card done by a White House staff artist; the first card to showcase the Oval Office; the first card to reveal the family quarters at Christmas, and the first card depicting activities on the White House lawn during the lighting of the National Christmas Tree.

    President Bush left the White House after four eventful years. Upon their departure, First Lady Barbara Bush remarked, “As someone blessed with the extraordinary privilege of living here, it was a bit surprising that this house so quickly became our home…the White House must be many things to many people: repository of so much of our history, seat of government, public museum and, of course, private residence. This wonderful place fills each of these roles magnificently.”

    Message on the Observance of Christmas 1989

    A Christmas card from...all the George Bushes...asking to Support UNICEF, date unknown

    A Christmas card from...all the George Bushes...asking to Support UNICEF, date unknown

    During the beautiful and holy season of Christmas, our hearts are filled with the same wonder, gratitude, and joy that led the psalmist of old to ask, “When I consider Thy heavens, the work of Thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which Thou hast ordained; What is man, that Thou art mindful of him? And the son of man, that Thou visitest him?” At Christmas, we, too, rejoice in the mystery of God’s love for us — love revealed through the gift of Christ’s birth.

    Born into a family of a young carpenter and his wife, in a stable shared by beasts of the field, our Savior came to live among ordinary men. Yet, in time, the miraculous nature of this simple event became clear. Christ’s birth changed the course of history, bringing the light of hope to a world dwelling in the darkness of sin and death.

    President Bush and First Lady Barbara ring the Salvation Army bell

    President Bush and First Lady Barbara ring the Salvation Army bell

    Today, nearly 2,000 years later, the shining promise of that first Christmas continues to give our lives a sense of peace and purpose. Our words and deeds, when guided by the example of Christ’s life, can help others share in the joy of man’s Redemption. During Christmas, we may symbolize this spirit of giving through the exchange of presents, but it is daily acts of goodness and generosity — performed time and time again throughout the year — that hold the true meaning of this holy season. Every kind and selfless deed we perform for others can rekindle in our hearts and in our communities the light of that first Christmas.

    As we gather with family and friends this season, let us recall what our Savior’s life means to the world. Let us also rededicate ourselves to sharing the love that gives greater meaning and joy to Christmas and to every moment of life.

    Merry Christmas, and God bless you.~President George HW Bush

    President William J. Clinton and First Lady Hillary 1993-2001

    Over her eight White House holiday seasons, First Lady Hillary Clinton showcased the talents of America’s artistic communities. Her 1993 “angels” theme coincided with “The Year of American Craft,” and the Blue Room tree was decked in 7,000 fiber, ceramic, glass, metal and wood angel ornaments. “The Twelve Days of Christmas” tree in 1994 displayed decorations by American art students. The 1995 “A Visit From St. Nicholas” tree featured pieces by architecture students and members of the American Institute of Architects. Stockings by the American Needlepoint Guild and the Embroiderers Guild of America also hung from its boughs. In 1996, woodcraft artisans and professional ballet companies helped bring “The Nutcracker” tree theme to life.

    Clinton Family Portrait

    Clinton Family Portrait

    For Christmas 1997, Mrs. Clinton had the National Needlework Association and the Council of Fashion Designers of American join with glass artisans on a “Santa’s Workshop” theme. In 1998, “A Winter Wonderland” united fabric artists from each state with the Knitting Guild of America and the Society of Decorative Painters. Doll makers created toy replicas of American historical figures for the 1999 “Holiday Treasures at the White House” tree. In 2000, selected ornaments from Mrs. Clinton’s past themes were featured on a “Holiday Reflections” Blue Room tree.

    First Lady Hillary Clinton poses with the gingerbread house in 1994

    First Lady Hillary Clinton poses with the gingerbread house in 1994

    The theme for the annual White House Christmas is a well-kept secret until early December when plans are revealed by the First Lady. This can be difficult when the nation’s best folk artists and craftsmen are anxiously awaiting the theme so they may begin designing and hand crafting ornaments for the White House tree. In 1993, artisans from each of the fifty states, territories, and the District of Columbia used a variety of quilting techniques in creating the individual panels of a green velvet tree skirt in honor of the Clinton family’s first holiday season at the White House.

    The Clintons in 1999

    The Clintons in 1999

    For Christmas 1994, a beautiful 18-foot Colorado blue spruce arrived at the White House from Clinton County, Missouri. The theme that year was “The Twelve Days of Christmas,” one of the First Family’s favorite holiday songs. In 1998, Mrs. Clinton encouraged everyone to relive their holiday memories. Artists from across the country were asked to craft ornaments in the spirit of the season — from miniature snowmen to tiny skis, skates, toboggans, colorful mittens and hats — to complete the theme of a Winter Wonderland.

    Going shopping at the malls, walking around and watching people always was a big part of Christmas for Bill Clinton, Hillary Rodham Clinton and their daughter, Chelsea-but one tradition not easily carried out as a First Family of the Land. Though the Clintons were all “pretty crazy … about celebrating Christmas,” according to the First Lady, the new President’s ambitious agenda for the country absorbed most of their attention. When informed that plans for the official Christmas card needed to be fully under way by May, the First Lady responded, “Being the type who’s relieved if my tree is up and decorated by Christmas Eve, I was shocked to hear this.”

     The Clintons' 1995 Christmas Card

    The Clintons' 1995 Christmas Card

    Even though planning for mistletoe and holly began during cherry blossom time, the task of choosing the design for the first official Christmas card was to present an unexpected challenge for the new administration. When the work of two artists was not accepted, and with time running short, photographer Neal Slavin came to the White House on Veterans Day to produce “instant art” depicting the President and First Lady posed before a decorated tree in the State Dining Room.

    Simultaneously, the Clintons commissioned contemporary figurative artist Thomas McKnight to do the art for the second year’s card. He showed up at the White House during Christmas 1993 and took lots of photographs. His unique style was to adorn the next three official Presidential cards in his renderings of the Red Room, Blue Room and Green Room. Artist Kay Jackson pleased the Clintons with her rendition of the White House at night for the 1997 Christmas card.

    First Lady Hillary Clinton with the White House with the traditional gingerbread house in 1997

    First Lady Hillary Clinton with the White House with the traditional gingerbread house in 1997

    The showcase piece in the State Dining Room is always the traditional gingerbread house created by the White House Pastry Chef. In 1997, the house was a sentimental favorite of the First Lady, as it is a replica of her girlhood home on Wisner Street in Park Ridge, Illinois. The two front rooms are done as they would appear in “The Night Before Christmas” the bedroom is filled with children “all snug in their beds,” and the living room is complete with “stockings hung by the chimney with care.” The gingerbread house took nearly five months to create… and of course, the entire creation is edible.

    The 1993 White House gingerbread house was dubbed the “House of Socks,” in honor of the Clintons’ cat. Pastry chef Roland Mesnier outfitted the gingerbread house with 21 marzipan figures of Socks in various poses, including the cat hauling Santa’s sleigh, ice-skating, playing a “Soxaphone,” and posing as a Secret Service agent.

    Clinton Grand Foyer Tree

    Clinton Grand Foyer Tree

    The four large trees that flank the front door and stand between the columns in the Grand Foyer have a special theme all their own. Decorated by chefs from cooking schools across the country, they are edible examples of the line, “while visions of sugar plums danced in their heads.” With marzipan, gingerbread, cookie dough, pastillage and chocolate, these culinary artists created some of this year’s most imaginative ornaments.

    Also in the Grand Foyer, you will see the needlepoint “kissing ball” made by master needlepoint artist, Hyla Hurley of Washington, D.C. It is a miniature version of the tapestry which hangs in the First Family residence, and depicts the road to the White House, from the Governor’s Mansion in Little Rock, via Monticello and a place called Hope.

    Message on the Observance of Christmas 1996

    President Clinton and First Lady Hillary at the 1996 National Christmas Tree lighting ceremony

    President Clinton and First Lady Hillary at the 1996 National Christmas Tree lighting ceremony

    Warm greetings to everyone celebrating Christmas.

    Each year during this blessed season, the world pauses to look back across the centuries to the birth of a Child. This Child was born to poor but loving parents in the small town of Bethlehem—born into a world where few noticed His coming, except for some simple shepherds and a few wise men. He was the Son of God and the King of Kings, but He chose to come among us as servant and Savior.

    Though two thousand years have passed since Jesus first walked the earth, much remains the same. Today’s world is still caught up in the challenges and cares of everyday existence, and too often we crowd God into the background of our experience. Too often we still ignore His loving presence in our lives and the precious gifts of peace and hope that He so freely offers to us all. And today, as on that first Christmas morning, He still reveals himself to the loving, the wise, and the simple of heart.

    The Roanoke College Children's Choir performed at the 1996 National Christmas Tree lighting ceremony

    The Roanoke College Children's Choir performed at the 1996 National Christmas Tree lighting ceremony

    As we gather with family and friends again this year to celebrate Christmas, let us welcome God wholeheartedly into our daily lives. Let us learn to recognize Him not only in the faces of our loved ones, but also in the faces of those who, like Jesus, are familiar with poverty, hardship, and rejection. And let us be inspired by His example to serve one another with generous hearts and open hands. In this way we will approach the dawn of a new century and a new millennium confident in God’s abundant grace and strengthened by His timeless promise of salvation.

    Hillary joins me in praying that the peace and joy of this holiday season will remain with you throughout the coming year. Merry Christmas, and God bless you.~President William J. Clinton

    Aaliyah Singing What Child Is This for the Clinton’s at Christmas in Washington 1998

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    President George W. Bush and First Lady Laura 2001-2008

    Message on the Observance of Christmas 2001
    Christmas is a time of wonder and joy, of generosity and peace, that brings family and friends together in celebration and song. We sing old hymns and familiar carols, we show love for others in the giving of gifts, and we observe the hallowed traditions that make the season special. This year in the midst of extraordinary times, our Nation has shown the world that though there is great evil, there is a greater good. Americans have given of themselves, sacrificing to help others and showing the spirit of love and sharing that is so much a part of the Christmas season.

    President Bush and the First Lady In front of the White House Christmas Tree December 2007

    According to the Gospel of Luke, two thousand years ago, the savior of mankind came into the world. Christians believe that Jesus’ birth was the incarnation of God on earth, opening the door to new hope and eternal life. At Christmastime, Christians celebrate God’s love revealed to the world through Christ. And the message of Jesus is one that all Americans can embrace this holiday season–to love one another.

    This Christmas we remember those who are without their loved ones. They continue to be in our hearts and prayers. May they experience peace, and may they find hope. And as we again celebrate Christ’s birth, may the glorious light of God’s goodness and love shine forth from our land.

    Laura joins me in wishing you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. May God’s blessings of peace be upon us and upon the world.~George W. Bush

    Laura Bush introduces Christmas card artist T. Allen Lawson and his work during a media preview in 2008.

    First Lady Laura Bush introduces Christmas card artist T. Allen Lawson and his work during a media preview in 2008.

    In 2001, First Lady Laura Bush chose “Home for the Holidays” as the White House Christmas tree theme. Artists from all 50 states and the District of Columbia designed model replicas of historic homes and houses of worship to hang as ornaments.

    For 2002, Mrs. Bush adopted the theme of “All Creatures Great and Small.” As an animal lover, she wanted to highlight the history and importance of pets in the White House. Perched on the boughs of the official tree are finely crafted representatives of America’s favorite birds. The tree stands in the oval Blue Room, an elegant space most often honored as the official center of holiday splendor in the White House.

    The White House was closed to visitors for George and Mrs. Bush’s first Christmas in the Executive Mansion. Terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. changed the way many things were done in post 9/11 America.

    In the Nov. 29, 2007, file photo above, an ornament honoring the Flight 93 National Monument hangs on the White House Christmas Tree during in the Blue Room at the White House during the presidency of George W. Bush.

    Official 2001 Christmas Card

    Official 2001 Christmas Card

    While the art for their first official card was already at Hallmark Cards for printing, Mrs. Bush changed her selection of a scripture verse to be incorporated in the card. The Bushes had consistently used scripture on their cards in the Governors Mansion. The verses taken from Psalm 27 read: “Thy face, Lord, do I seek: I believe that I shall see the goodness of the Lord in the Land of the Living.”

    Adrian Martinez, an artist from Downingtown, PA, was chosen to paint the interior scene that graced the Bush’s first official card. The story of his youth and how he was selected makes for interesting reading in “Season’s Greetings from the White House.” The card featured the Second Floor Corridor of the White House with Mary Cassatt’s 1908 painting, Young Mother and Two Children. Mrs. Bush selected the Psalm for the card on September 16. At Camp David, the chaplain based his sermon on the Psalm, which was outlined in the lectionary for that September Sunday.

    First Lady Laura Bush, with Barney and Miss Beazley, in the 2008 Barney Cam video.

    First Lady Laura Bush, with Barney and Miss Beazley, in the 2008 Barney Cam video.

    With public access to the White House more restricted in the aftermath of the 9/11 terror attacks, first lady Laura Bush sent the family’s terrier, Barney, out to prowl the building with a little camera attached to his collar in 2002. Barney Cam’s 4.5-minute video tour of the mansion decorations got 24 million views in its first day on the White House Web site and his movies became an annual feature after that.

    What started out in 1953 with President Eisenhower sending out 1000 White House Christmas cards, by the 21st century, had turned into a behemoth. In 2008, President Bush and the First Lady Laura sent 2.25 million cards to friends and associates.

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    President Bush Attends Lighting of the National Christmas Tree 2006

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    Bush White House Christmas Party in 2008

    President Bush and First Lady Laura Bush welcomed the children of servicemen to the White House for a Christmas party.
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    A Very Barney Christmas in 2008

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    First Lady Laura Bush Discusses White House Christmas Decorations in 2008

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    President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle 2009-

    President Barack H. Obama (born August 4, 1961) is the 44th and current President of the United States. He is the first African-American to hold the office, as well as the first president born in Hawaii. Obama previously served as the junior United States Senator from Illinois from January 2005 until he resigned after his election to the presidency in November 2008.

    Obama is a graduate of Columbia University and Harvard Law School, where he was the president of the Harvard Law Review. He was a community organizer in Chicago before earning his law degree. He worked as a civil rights attorney in Chicago and taught constitutional law at the University of Chicago Law School from 1992 to 2004.

    Obama served three terms in the Illinois Senate from 1997 to 2004. Following an unsuccessful bid for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives in 2000, he ran for United States Senate in 2004. During the campaign, several events brought him to national attention, such as his victory in the March 2004 Democratic primary election for the United States Senator from Illinois as well as his prime-time televised keynote address at the Democratic National Convention in July 2004. He won election to the U.S. Senate in November 2004.

    Obama began his run for the presidency in February 2007. After a close campaign in the 2008 Democratic Party presidential primaries against Hillary Clinton, he won his party’s nomination. In the 2008 general election, he defeated Republican nominee John McCain and was inaugurated as president on January 20, 2009. Obama is the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize laureate.

    Please CLICK the symbol below to check out how the Obama’s are celebrating their first Christmas in the White House!

    Click here!

    A special note of thanks goes to our friends at White House Christmas Cards, for allowing us to use some of their outstanding research material as part of this presentation. If you are interested in a more in-depth study of Christmas in the White House, we highly recommend you visit their site.

    Back to The History of Christmas at the White House Main Page

    Back to The History of Christmas at the White House Main Page

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    Back to Happy Holidays Main Page

    Back to Happy Holidays Main Page

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    Filed under Art, Charity, Children, Christmas, Christmas at the White House, Culture, Dancing, Entertainment, Holidays, Media and Entertainment, Music, Politics, Pop Culture, Presidents, Uncategorized, United States, US, Video/YouTube, Washington, DC, Women's Issues

    The Strange Case Of The Philandering, Muslim-Threat-Hyping FBI Agent

    Posted by Buellboy

    Fmr. FBI Agent John Guandolo

    Fmr. FBI Agent John Guandolo

    I know its been mentioned on 44D before, but what the heck is going on with all these over-sexed Republicans?

    Just askin’

    TPMMuckracker’s Justin Elliott has the scoop…

    TPMMuckracker/Justin Elliott—An FBI agent who worked on the corruption case of former Louisiana Congressman William Jefferson resigned after superiors found a list he wrote of his sexual conquests with agents and a confidential source, according to court documents.

    The same agent, John Guandolo, who is married and who unsuccessfully solicited a $75,000 donation for an anti-terrorism group from a wealthy witness in the Jefferson case with whom he was having an affair, resigned from the FBI and appears to have landed on his feet on the speaking circuit playing up the threat of Islamic terrorism.

    The affair list was first reported by Allan Lengel at ticklethewire.com

    The relationship between Guandolo and key government informant Lori Mody, a former tech executive for whom Guandolo worked undercover as a driver, failed to derail the Jefferson conviction after a judge ruled it irrelevant this week.

    Learn more

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    Filed under Al-Qaeda, Law, Middle East, Military, Partisan Politics, Politics, Republicans, Terrorism, Uncategorized