Tag Archives: hospital

Breaking News: Bill Clinton Hospitalized for Chest Pain


4:23 CST~President Bill Clinton was rushed to the Columbia Campus of New York Presbyterian Hospital in Manhattan today after experiencing chest pain.

Douglas Band, a counselor for the 63-year-old former President, says he is in “good spirits” and released the following statement:

“Today President Bill Clinton was admitted to the Columbia Campus of NY Presbyterian hospital after feeling discomfort in his chest.

Following a visit to his cardiologist, he underwent a procedure to place 2 stents in one of his coronary arteries.

President Clinton is in good spirits and will continue to focus on the work of his Foundation and Haiti’s relief and long-term recovery efforts.”

The statement continues, “In 2004, President Clinton underwent a successful quadruple bypass operation to free four blocked arteries.”

UPDATE: Secretary of State Hilary Clinton has announced that she’s on her way from Washington to be with Bill.

Story developing…

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    Filed under Hillary Rodham Clinton (Sec of State), Politics, Uncategorized, William (Bill) J. Clinton

    The Political Carnival: Video- Kurtz and Panel Mock Limbaugh Saying He Didn’t Get Special Treatment

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    Filed under Conservative, Health, Health Care Reform, Media and Entertainment, Partisan Politics, Politics, Pundits (radio), Pundits (television), Republicans, Rush Limbaugh, Uncategorized, Video/YouTube

    44-D’s Impact Diaries: Largest-Ever Kidney Swap Donors and Patients Meet

    26 Operations Done Over Six Days Gave 13 People New Kidneys In Huge Lifesaving Effort

    Posted by Audiegrl

    Kidney donors (left to right) Bill Singleton, Lucien Boyd, Sylvia Glaser, Kelvina Hudgens, Pamela Hull and Tom Otten attend a news conference at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington D.C. on Dec. 15. The donors are part of a record-setting 13-way kidney swap, a pioneering effort to expand transplants to patients who too often never qualify.

    Kidney donors (left to right) Bill Singleton, Lucien Boyd, Sylvia Glaser, Kelvina Hudgens, Pamela Hull and Tom Otten attend a news conference at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington D.C. on Dec. 15.

    Associated Press—Thirteen patients with healthy new kidneys from what’s believed to be the world’s largest kidney exchange met the donors who made it happen Tuesday — including three who are sure to face the question, “Why?”

    A hospice nurse who handed homemade cookies to her operating team. A retired stockbroker who had volunteered with the National Kidney Foundation and decided to walk the talk. And a woman inspired by President Barack Obama’s call to volunteer. They all donated a kidney with nothing to gain — they didn’t have a friend or loved one in the marathon chain of transplants that they helped make possible.

    It feels wonderful,” Sylvia Glaser, 69, the hospice nurse, said Tuesday at a news conference where most of the donors and recipients met for the first time. “You are giving someone a life, and there is no substitute for that.”

    It’s not like I’m doing anything courageous,” Bill Singleton, 62, the kidney foundation volunteer, told The Associated Press before his surgery. “If I don’t volunteer, who will?”

    Kidney exchanges widen the pool of potential donors for the hardest-to-transplant patients — minorities as well as people whose immune systems have become abnormally primed to attack a donated kidney. What happens: Patients find a friend or relative who isn’t compatible with them but will donate on their behalf, and the pairs are mixed to find the most matches.

    Roxanne Boyd Williams, left, cries as she meets her kidney donor Tom Otten, a suburban St. Louis police officer, in an emotional reunion at the Georgetown University Hospital in Washington D.C. on Dec. 11. Otten's wife, Irene, also received a kidney as part of the donor chain.

    Roxanne Boyd Williams, left, cries as she meets her kidney donor Tom Otten, a suburban St. Louis police officer, in an emotional reunion at the Georgetown University Hospital in Washington D.C. on Dec. 11. Otten's wife, Irene, also received a kidney as part of the donor chain.

    But a donor whose kidney isn’t directed to a particular patient — a so-called altruistic or non-directed donor — multiplies the number of operations that can be done in a kidney swap. And Dr. Keith Melancon at Georgetown University Hospital had three such donors, people he calls “pieces of gold.”

    People keep wanting to know why, why, why,” Glaser, the Gaithersburg, MD, nurse said before her surgery. “It sounds very trite but you pass through this world, and what do you ever do that makes a difference?”

    The AP documented weeks of the complex logistics as Melancon’s team initially planned for a 16-way exchange, juggled donors and recipients for the best matches — and emerged with a record-setting exchange: Twenty-six operations over six days this month at Georgetown and nearby Washington Hospital Center.

    Ten of the 13 recipients were African-American, Asian or Hispanic. And five were patients who never would have received a kidney under the traditional system, because they needed an extra blood-cleansing treatment to remove those hyperactive immune cells, treatment that only a handful of hospitals in the country offer.

    Kidney transplant recipient Solomon Weldeghebriel, second from left, with kidney donor Bill Singleton, right, holds his children Mahor, 5, left, and daughter Simona Weldeghebriel, 3

    Kidney transplant recipient Solomon Weldeghebriel, second from left, with kidney donor Bill Singleton, right, holds his children Mahor, 5, left, and daughter Simona Weldeghebriel, 3

    I cannot explain in words. I can raise my children now. He gave me life,” said Solomon Weldeghebriel, 42, a Washington cabdriver. Two of his three children wiggled on his lap as he met Singleton, his donor.

    The exchange started with a 45-year-old Maryland woman inspired by President Obama. She asked to remain anonymous but told The AP: “I just wanted to help someone out that needed my help, to give them a better life.”

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    Filed under African-Americans, Asian/Pacific Islander, Barack Obama, Charity, Health, Health Care Reform, Hispanic/Latino/Latina, Maryland, Medicine, News, Presidents, Uncategorized, United States, Volunteerism, Washington, DC

    Great Britain: Tamiflu-Resistant Strain of Swine Flu Spreading

    Posted by Audiegrl

    Resistant strain discovered in Cardiff hospital, prompting concern among health officials

    guardian.co.uk/Owen Bowcott—Doctors in Wales have discovered a Tamiflu-resistant strain of swine flu that has been spreading from patient to patient in a Cardiff hospital.

    The emergence of an easily transmissible, resistant strain is a worrying development for health officials and appears to be the first documented case in Europe.

    Five patients at University Hospital Wales, in Cardiff, were infected and isolated for treatment. All had severe underlying conditions that left them with weakened immune systems. At least three had acquired the infection in hospital.

    There have been a handful of reported cases from around the world of Tamiflu-resistant strains of the H1N1 virus. Only one previous case, at a US summer camp, however, involved person-to-person transmission.

    The Cardiff patients have been treated with an alternative anti-viral drug. Two have recovered and been discharged and three others remain in hospital, one in intensive care.

    Dr Roland Salmon, the director of the communicable disease surveillance center in Wales, said: “The emergence of [H1N1] viruses that are resistant to Tamiflu is not unexpected in patients with serious underlying conditions and suppressed immune systems, who still test positive for the virus despite treatment.

    In this case, the resistant strain of swine flu does not appear to be any more severe than the swine flu virus that has been circulating since April.

    For the vast majority of people, Tamiflu has proved effective in reducing the severity of illness. Vaccination remains the most effective tool we have in preventing swine flu so I urge people identified as being at risk to look out for their invitation to be vaccinated by their GP surgery.

    Any spread of a Tamiflu-resistant strain of the virus into the community would constitute a serious public health concern. The government recently reminded those who caught swine flu to take Tamiflu as a first line of medical defense.

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    Filed under England, Europe, H1N1/Swine Flu, Health, Medicine, News, Uncategorized