Tag Archives: doomsday

The 2012 Phenomenon + 10 failed doomsday predictions

posted by GeoT

(2012) “I’ve got kids; this really scares the hell out of me. Is there something I should be doing? Is this real?”

By Robert Roy Britt There’s no shortage of end-of-the-world prophecies and hoaxes, but the latest one has a slick twist. Or, some might say, a sick twist.

In fact, just by writing about it, I’m playing into the hands of a big media company that hopes I will write about it, or at least pass the word and a link, so that they can ultimately make money. Rather, I’ll try to keep a few people from being frightened.

The story starts with Mike Brown, an astronomer at Caltech who has found more planet-like objects in our outer solar system than anyone.

Just like this reporter, Brown gets a lot emails from people worried the world will end in 2012. So many, in fact, that Brown has come to call them “The 2012 People.” He’s long assumed they’re rather gullible worry warts. His view just changed a little.
The concerns often stem from bogus information about a fantasy planet dubbed Nibiru which, the story goes, will swing into the inner solar system, smack Earth in 2012, and bring an end to it all. (Brown assures us there is no such planet, and no such looming scenario known to science.)

The emails have been increasing of late. And recently one concerned citizen went a step farther and called and left Brown a voice mail: “I’ve got kids; this really scares the hell out of me. Is there something I should be doing? Is this real?”

The planet hunter reassured the man that it was all just a hoax. The man was grateful.

But the man got Brown’s attention.

Story continues here:

2012 The Movie

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10 Failed Doomsday Predictions

The Millerites, April 23, 1843

A New England farmer named William Miller, after several years of very careful study of his Bible, concluded that God’s chosen time to destroy the world could be divined from a strict literal interpretation of scripture. As he explained to anyone who would listen, the world would end some time between March 21, 1843 and March 21, 1844. He preached and published enough to eventually lead thousands of followers (known as Millerites) who decided that the actual date was April 23, 1843. Many sold or gave away their possessions, assuming they would not be needed; though when April 23 arrived (but Jesus didn’t) the group eventually disbanded—some of them forming what is now the Seventh Day Adventists.


Nostradamus, August 1999

The heavily obfuscated and metaphorical writings of Michel de Nostredame have intrigued people for over 400 years. His writings, the accuracy of which relies heavily upon very flexible interpretations, have been translated and re-translated in dozens of different versions. One of the most famous quatrains read, “The year 1999, seventh month / From the sky will come great king of terror.” Many Nostradamus devotees grew concerned that this was the famed prognosticator’s vision of Armageddon.


May 5, 2000

In case the Y2K bug didn’t do us in, global catastrophe was assured by Richard Noone, author of the 1997 book “5/5/2000 Ice: the Ultimate Disaster.” According to Noone, the Antarctic ice mass would be three miles thick by May 5, 2000 — a date in which the planets would be aligned in the heavens, somehow resulting in a global icy death (or at least a lot of book sales). Perhaps global warming kept the ice age at bay.


Heaven’s Gate, 1997

When comet Hale-Bopp appeared in 1997, rumors surfaced that an alien spacecraft was following the comet — covered up, of course, by NASA and the astronomical community. Though the claim was refuted by astronomers (and could be refuted by anyone with a good telescope), the rumors were publicized on Art Bell’s paranormal radio talk show “Coast to Coast AM.” These claims inspired a San Diego UFO cult named Heaven’s Gate to conclude that the world would end soon. The world did indeed end for 39 of the cult members, who committed suicide on March 26, 1997.
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Why the World Will NOT End in 2012: Nasa Scientist Debunks Conspiracy Theories

Posted by Audiegrl

Doomsday? The film 2012 will inflame existing fears about the possible end of the world

Doomsday? The film 2012 will inflame existing fears about the possible end of the world

Mail Online/Niall Firth & Claire Bates—Dr David Morrison, who runs the space agency’s ‘Ask an Astrobiologist‘ service, says he has received more than a thousand emails from those worried that the world is due to end in 2012.

In an article published by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, Dr Morrison has answered the top 20 questions in an attempt to assuage these fears.

According to the theories on the internet, the calendar used by the ancient civilization of the Mayans is due to come to an end in December 2012.

The Mayan calendar ends in 2012, but Dr Morrison said this did not mean the world would end

The Mayan calendar ends in 2012, but Dr Morrison said this did not mean the world would end

Luckily for conspiracy theorists, this coincides neatly with predictions by an obscure sci-fi author, who wrote about the ancient Mesopotamian civilization of Sumer, that a planet named Nibiru will collide with the Earth on that date.

Fears have been further inflamed by an apocalyptic film called ‘2012‘ starring John Cusack, which is out this November. A quick search on Amazon reveals there are 175 books listed that deal with 2012 doomsday.

First off Dr Morrison dismisses the possibility that the planet Nibiru even exists.

He writes: The bottom line is that Nibiru is a myth, with no basis in fact.

To an astronomer, persistent claims about a planet that is “nearby” but “invisible” are just plain silly.’

Nasa scientist Dr. David Morrison

Nasa scientist Dr. David Morrison

And Dr Morrison laughs off suggestions that the government has been complicit in hiding its existence from the public.

Even if they wanted to, the government could not keep Nibiru a secret,’ he says.

If it were real, it would be tracked by thousands of astronomers, amateurs as well a professional. These astronomers are spread all over the world.

I know the astronomy community, and these scientists would not keep a secret even if ordered to. You just can’t hide a planet on its way to the inner solar system!’

He also addresses the concerns of those who worry that the Mayan calendar is due to end in 2012.

Ancient calendars are interesting to historians, but they cannot match the ability we have today to keep track of time, or the precision of the calendars currently in use.

The main point, however, is that calendars, whether contemporary or ancient, cannot predict the future of our planet or warn of things to happen on a specific date such as 2012.

‘I note that my desk calendar ends much sooner, on December 31 2009, but I do not interpret this as a prediction of Armageddon. It is just the beginning of a new year.’

Nostradamus

Nostradamus

He added although many believe prophecies by the sixteenth century seer Nostradamus predict the end of the world in 2012, there is no evidence he has correctly predicted anything.

He also tackles the belief circulating on some internet forums that an alignment of planets in our galaxy the Milky Way could in some way disrupt the Earth’s gravitational field or reverse the Earth’s rotation.

A reversal in the rotation of Earth is impossible. It has never happened and never will,’ he said.

He added that although the magnetic polarity of Earth does take place around every 400,000 years scientists don’t believe it will take place for another few millennia and there is no evidence it would do any harm.

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