Tiger’s Validation Complex by Eugene Robinson

Op-Ed by Eugene Robinson

Pulitzer Prize Winning Journalist, Eugene Robinson

Pulitzer Prize Winning Journalist, Eugene Robinson

Washington Post/Eugene Robinson—Leave Tiger alone. Enough with the puns — we get that he’s really just a “cheetah” in disguise. Enough with the Barbie-of-the-Day revelations — we get that he’s attracted to a certain type. Enough with the whole thing — we have far more important things to worry about.

Yeah, right. Sit down with a friend over lunch and try to have a conversation about health care, climate change, financial regulation or Afghanistan without straying at least once onto the oh-so-unimportant subject of Tiger Woods’s philandering. I’ve given up trying to deny that the unfolding saga is compelling, even if paying attention leaves me feeling a bit disappointed in myself. Prurient interest is rarely something to be proud of.

I’m beginning to fear, actually, that the unfolding may never end. If you’re the richest, most famous athlete on the planet, and you have an eye for cocktail waitresses and nightclub hostesses, the opportunities to cheat are probably limited only by the number of hours in the day. It’s becoming clear why Woods’s initial mea culpa was worded vaguely to cover any and all “transgressions.” Wouldn’t want to leave anybody out.

I’m not going to pronounce judgment on Woods’s moral fiber, except to state that adultery is bad. I’m also not going to judge the women who have reportedly had affairs with him, except to point out how quick they’ve been, as soon as their names have surfaced, to retain high-priced legal counsel. I will suggest that Woods consider this possibility: Random women he meets in restaurants or bars may not be reduced to putty by his good looks or sparkling wit, but may in fact be aware of how wealthy he is.

I was going to critique Woods’s technique of adultery, or at least his apparent selection of playmates, as measured against a theory about philandering developed by my colleague Roxanne Roberts, who has spent years covering the capital’s libidinous social scene for The Post. Roberts postulates that famous, powerful men who stray would be smart to choose women who have just as much to lose if the liaison were exposed. Some ultra-rich tycoon’s young trophy wife, say, would fit that criterion. Cocktail waitresses and nightclub hostesses, not so much.

In fact, Woods seems to have hooked up with the kind of women who save old voice mails and text messages — giving their high-priced legal counsel something to work with.

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1 Comment

Filed under Culture, Entertainment, Eugene Robinson, Golf, Media and Entertainment, Pop Culture, Pundits (print), Sex, Sports, Television, World

One response to “Tiger’s Validation Complex by Eugene Robinson

  1. Trace

    See the stupid _ _ it we get caught up on! As an AFRICAN AMERICAN PROFESSIONAL WOMAN – I think the focus is entirely misplaced. I think we can use this as a teachable moment to uplift the virtues of black women in that they are not caught up this nonsense. His proclivity for certain types of women i.e. cocktail waitresses and or Caucasians, has nothing to do with his actions which are what most people should be focused on. Don’t hold yourself out as this virtuous family man and portray this image of wholesomeness when you are the biggest fraud walking! Porn stars? Oh my! What is the list at now; seven and rising.

    We all are sinners and have shortcomings. Two of Tiger’s issues, among other things, are that he put this fake image out there and that he strived for privacy ostensibly under the auspices of protecting his family when all he was really doing was protecting himself. And I might add, not very well. Isn’t it fascinating that most of these women kept recordings and text messages he sent them over the years. I guess they really did learn from Monica Lewinsky that without proof you have nothing.

    Let the payouts begin! Starting bid for silence: $1,000,000.

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